Secrecy: Press Behavior

Latest in Secrecy: Press Behavior

Secrecy: Press Behavior

Journalism in the Doxing Era: Is WikiLeaks Different from the New York Times?

The question is provocative, but the answer is hard. The reaction to WikiLeaks’ publication of the fruits of Russia’s DNC hack raises many puzzles about how we should think about publication of truthful secret information that touches on public affairs. These puzzles are important to figure out, since organizational doxing is growing more prevalent and consequential and our intuitions about it are not obviously coherent.

Secrecy: FOIA

NYT v. DOJ, Part 2: Second Circuit Narrows Circumstances in Which Official Statements Waive FOIA Exemption 5 Protection

The five-year targeted killing FOIA litigation by the ACLU and New York Times suffered a setback yesterday when the Second Circuit unsealed an opinion affirming an SDNY ruling from October 2014 allowing DOJ to withhold several OLC documents related to lethal targeting.

Targeted Killing: Drones

A Response to the “Drone Papers”: AUMF Targeting is a Deliberate Process with Robust Political Accountability

The Intercept’s “Drone Papers” leaker “believes the public has a right to know how the U.S. government decides to assassinate people.” Maybe so—or maybe public safety and the need for secrecy trump the public’s curiosity. Unfortunately, the leaker has unilaterally decided for all of us. One person with a thumb drive again trumps the democratic process.

Secrecy & Leaks

20 Senior Former CIA Officials Criticize NYT For Publishing Names of Covert Operatives

Twenty senior former CIA officials—including every CIA Director (including DCIs) dating back to William Webster (1987-91)—wrote a letter to the NYT to take issue with NYT Executive Editor Dean Baquet’s defense (in this interview on Lawfare) of his decision to publish the names of the three covert CIA operatives in http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/26/us/politics/deep

Media Criticism

Another Response to the New York Times Flap

An intelligence community reader writes in with the following response to my post this morning on Dean Baquet's interview with Jack:

The issue is not [only] whether the true name and affiliation [of the covert officer] are known to the editors and reporters of the New York Times, and to the persons in their professional and social circles.  It is [also] whether that true name and affiliation are known to vast number

Subscribe to Lawfare

EmailRSSKindle