Secrecy & Leaks

Laura Poitras/Praxis Films / Ben Balter (background)

As long as there are governments, there will be government secrets—and there will also be leakers and whistleblowers. Recent high profile disclosures by Private Chelsea Manning and former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden have renewed national discussion of the proper limits of American intelligence authorities and the proper limits of secrecy. They have reinvigorated also the debate over what tools prosecutors and agencies ought to use in identifying and prosecuting those who violate government confidences.

Latest in Secrecy & Leaks

Documents

Document: Former Intelligence Analyst Charged With Providing Classified Information to Reporter

On Thursday, the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia unsealed an indictment charging Daniel Everett Hale, a former intelligence analyst with the Air Force and National Security Agency and a former contractor at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, with five counts, including four under the Espionage Act, for providing classified information to a reporter.

Documents

Document: Julian Assange Indictment

On Thursday, the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia unsealed a March 6, 2018 indictment charging Julian Assange, the founder head of WikiLeaks, for conspiring to commit computer intrusions by assisting Chelsea Manning with breaking a U.S. government password. The grand jury charged violations of 18 U.S.C. §§371, 1030(a)(1), 1030(a)(2) and 1030(c)(2)(B)(ii).

Donald Trump

Document: Don't Take Trump's Tweets Literally, Justice Department Argues

The Department of Justice submitted an unusual court filing in litigation over the release of the Carter Page FISA, arguing that the president's statements on Twitter concerning the Page FISA should not be assumed to be accurate or based on the president's personal knowledge of the underlying issue. The document, which was filed on Nov. 30 and first flagged by USA Today reporter Brad Heath, is available here and below.

Subscribe to Lawfare

EmailRSSKindle