Politics & National Security

Tony Webster / Ben Balter (background)

One of the great benefits of democracy is that politics impacts policy, even national security policy. Elections, confirmation battles, and legislative fights all affect the way the United States balances its competing priorities, interests and values as it conducts foreign and security affairs. National security professionals would therefore be wise to keep an eye on what candidates are saying about national security matters, how they are faring in the polls, and on which way the winds in Congress seem to be blowing the national security issues of the day.

Latest in Politics & National Security

Politics & National Security

Livestream: Senate Intelligence Committee Hearing on the Policy Response to Russian Interference in the 2016 Elections

Ambassador Victoria Nuland, Chief Executive Officer at the Center for a New American Security, and Michael Daniel, President of Cyber Threat Alliance, will testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee on the policy response to Russian interference in the 2016 elections. The hearing is scheduled to begin at 10:45 a.m. Watch the livestream below: 

 

Federal Law Enforcement

Livestream: Justice Department Inspector General Testifies on Clinton Email Investigation Report

Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz will testify before the House Committees on the Judiciary and Oversight and Government Reform on last week’s inspector general report on the FBI’s handling of the Clinton email investigation. The hearing is scheduled to begin at 10:00 a.m.

Federal Law Enforcement

Livestream: FBI Director and Justice Department Inspector General Testify on Clinton Email Investigation Report

FBI Director Christopher Wray and Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz will testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on last week’s inspector general report on the FBI’s handling of the Clinton email investigation. The hearing will begin at 2:00 p.m. Watch the livestream below: 

Public Opinion

Law and Public Intuition on the Use of Force, Part 2: The Threat of Nuclear Weapons

We conducted a public opinion survey that found that Americans are sensitive to considerations of necessity, proportionality, and congressional authorization when evaluating whether the use of force is a justified response to a military threat from a foreign country. But what if the threat in question isn’t a conventional military one?

Subscribe to Lawfare

EmailRSSKindle