Latest in The National Security Law Podcast

Podcasts

The National Security Law Podcast: A Deep Dive into the Steel Seizure Case

This week, we explore the iconic 1952 decision of the Supreme Court in Youngstown Sheet & Tube Co. v. Sawyer, better known as the “Steel Seizure Case.” It’s an all-time classic regarding the separation of powers in general and war-related powers in particular (not to mention constitutional interpretive method, theories of emergency power, and more). In this deep dive, we:

Podcasts

The National Security Law Podcast: A Deep Dive into the Anwar al-Awlaki Case(s)

We are back this week with a new “deep dive” episode, this time focused on the issues raised by the U.S. government’s use of lethal force against Anwar al-Awlaki–a U.S. citizen who became a key figure associated with al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula.  Tune in for a detailed backgrounder covering:

Podcasts

The National Security Law Podcast: Party Like It’s June 28, 2004!

It had to happen sooner or later: an actual slow week for national security law!  Ugh!  Well, time to make lemonade from the lemons.  A slow week in NSL news means that we can take a run at a format that we originally expected to be a mainstay for the show: a deep-dive into a single significant development.

The National Security Law Podcast

The National Security Law Podcast: [Steve] Is the Kiss of Death

Welcome to the latest National Security Law Podcast episode.  Though Steve and Bobby both have been moonlighting (here is Steve on the Lawfare Podcast and here’s Bobby on the Cyber Law Podcast), there’s no place like home, and both are back in the studio this morning to recount and debate the latest national security legal develop

Podcasts

The National Security Law Podcast: The Road to 10,000

We’re back after a one-week layoff!  No SCOTUS announcement yet, alas, but we do have this to offer:

1. Doe v. Mattis and the upcoming hearing on the government’s plan to release Doe in Syria

2. The military commissions and the retirement of Judge Spath

3. Over in the civilian court system, Uzair Paracha, convicted back in 2005, just won a motion for a new trial based on newly-discovered evidence (involving CSRT and other statements from GTMO detainees)

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