International Law

Kevin Quinn / Ben Balter (background)

More than any other policy area, the conduct of security affairs implicates legal systems beyond our own domestic law. Despite a deep-seated American distrust of international law, a web of international norms, treaties and agreements compels the United States to defend its conduct in terms intelligible to the world at large. As policymakers grapple with issues from cyberwar to targeted killings, legal expertise in international humanitarian law, the law of armed conflict, and a myriad other areas of international law will only become more crucial.

 

Latest in International Law

International Law: Self-Defense

The Aborted Iran Strike: The Fine Line Between Necessity and Revenge

Self-defense may never be invoked to justify an act of retaliation or revenge in response to an unlawful threat that is no longer ongoing or imminent. So was the U.S. right to point to self-defense in justifying a strike against Iran following the shootdown of a U.S. drone?

Cybersecurity: LOAC-Military

Crossing a Cyber Rubicon? Overreactions to the IDF’s Strike on the Hamas Cyber Facility

After the Israel Defense Forces announced it launched an airstrike on a Hamas facility used for cyber operations, some observers warned that a dangerous line had been crossed and others questioned the legality of the strike itself. Both are wrong.

Documents

Document: Judge in Abu Ghraib Case Denies U.S. Sovereign Immunity for Jus Cogens Norms

On Friday, Judge Leonie M. Brinkema of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia granted government motions to dismiss and for summary judgment in Al Shimari v. CACI, a case brought by plaintiffs who were detained in Abu Ghraib. The full opinion is available here and below.

 

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