Latest in Guantanamo: Litigation

Guantanamo: Legislation

The Meaningful Legal Differences Between Stateside and Guantánamo Detention

Gabor's post from this morning, which is styled as a response to Ben's thoughtful analysis of what it will take to close Guantánamo (while ignoring some of the other responses), concludes that the only meaningful way to "close" Guantánamo is for President Obama "to either release all detainees or try them in our time-tested federal courts," at least largely because moving the detainees into the United States wouldn

Guantanamo: Legislation

How Not to Close Guantanamo: Bring It Here

Ben asks “What Would it Take to Close Guantanamo?” and he provides a thoughtful response weighted toward the political landscape. But there’s another not-so-merely-philosophical question that underlies his question: what does it mean to “close Guantanamo?”

For purposes of rapprochement with Cuba it may have to mean U.S. out of Guantanamo altogether.

Detention: Law of

What the Detention Policy Debate Really Is About

Ben bemoans the state our nation’s current debate over Guantanamo as “terrible,” observing that “the arguments about Guantanamo are nearly all wrong, disingenuous, irrelevant, or just plain dumb.”  It’s true that Guantanamo—like most political issues—sometimes takes on a special kind of inside-the-beltway rhetorical flavor that can really annoy the wonks, who would much rather focus on the underlying policy debate.

So what is the underlying policy debate all about?  Perhaps it’s

Guantanamo

Moral Obtuseness, Guantanamo, Boko Haram, and the Media

This morning's BBC’s NewsHour show opened with a news judgment reflecting a genuinely odd moral calculus.

At the end of the show’s headlines section, announcer James Menendez says: “coming up later in the program today, our West Africa correspondent . . . is on the shores of Lake Chad, where survivors---many of them missing family members---have been gathering in the wake of last week’s deadly attacks by Boko Haram.” That, however, could wait until the second half of the show.

Interrogation: CIA Program

Released: SSCI Detention and Interrogation Study, Along With Minority Views and the CIA's Response

Here is the long-awaited Executive Summary of the Senate Intelligence Committee's Study of the CIA's Detention and Interrogation Program. The latter includes in a single file a foreword authored by Senator Feinstein, as well as the Study's findings and conclusions.

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