FISA

Ken Lund / Ben Balter (background)

First passed in 1978, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) still guides the physical and electronic surveillance of foreign powers and agents. Congress has repeatedly amended the law, however, seeking to calibrate the government’s surveillance to accord with the level of threat and seeking to keep authorities current as technology develops at breakneck speed. Nevertheless, even authorized activities affirmatively permitted by statute have come under fire as a torrent of leaks have revealed government surveillance programs under the statute.

Latest in FISA

FISA

Justice Department Releases Its Review of FISA Applications Examined by Inspector General

The Justice Department's National Security Division released a review of 29 applications for Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) warrants. The 29 applications had been previously examined by the Justice Department's Office of Inspector General (OIG), which shared its findings in a March report.

FISA

Justice Department Inspector General Finds Broader Pattern of Errors in FISA Applications

A new report released by the Justice Department inspector general found errors or lost information in all of the U.S. Person FISA applications it reviewed following its report on the FBI’s “Crossfire Hurricane” investigation into members of the Trump campaign. Each of the 29 applications reviewed contained inaccuracies, including missing files in four FISA applications and errors or inadequately supported facts in the 25 other applications.

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