Executive Power

Pete Souza

Debates over the proper scope of executive power in the United States have been a feature of U.S. law and politics dating back to before the nation’s founding. Article II of the Constitution vests the president with “the executive power” and the power to act as the military’s Commander in Chief, but the post-9/11 presidency has been characterized as a striking expansion of executive power, particularly in the area of national security.

Latest in Executive Power

Immigration

Court Enjoins Border Wall Construction

The U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California has denied in part and granted in part a motion for a preliminary injunction against the government's construction of a border wall using funds reprogrammed by the Defense Department, enjoining the secretaries of defense, treasury and homeland security from taking action to construct a wall along certain sections of the U.S.-Mexico border. The opinion is available here and below.

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