Detention: Operations in Afghanistan

Latest in Detention: Operations in Afghanistan

Covert Action: Rendition

The SSCI Report and Its Critics: Torturing Efficacy

Polarization surrounding the SSCI Report (see here for Lawfare’s coverage) has been most pronounced on the efficacy of enhanced interrogation techniques (EITs). The Report and its supporters have proclaimed that EITs never produce useful information. Unfortunately, that pat assertion undermines the possibility of a consensus on future interrogation tactics, including a consensus that rules out coercion.

NIAC: Conflict with IHRL

Findings, Conclusions and Areas of Dispute Between the SSCI Report, the Minority and the CIA: Part 2

Below, you will find the second installment in our ongoing effort to identify, in summary form, key areas of dispute as between the SSCI, the SSCI minority, and the CIA with regard the CIA's detention and interrogation program. As you surely know by now, all three today released long-anticipated reports regarding the CIA's post-9/11 detention and interrogation activities. 

Interrogation

ICC Prosecutor Advances Examination of U.S. Detention Policies in Afghanistan

As Professors Ryan Goodman and David Bosco have both noted in excellent posts at Just Security and Foreign Policy, respectively, over the past seven years, the International Criminal Court’s (ICC) Prosecutor has quietly but persistently advanced a “preliminary examination” of the conflict in Afghanistan.  Although it has been

Detention: Non-Guantanamo Habeas Litigation

The Rahmatullah Saga Goes On

Last week, a British court allowed civil tort claims against the British government to proceed. In Rahmatullah v. Ministry of Defence, the High Court (Queen’s Bench Division) held that a former Pakistani detainee—captured by the United Kingdom but then transferred to American custody—was not barred from suing by either the state immunity or the foreign act of state doctrines.

Terrorism Trials: Civilian Court

Russian Bagram Detainee Set for Federal Prosecution in U.S.

Or so I gather from this Washington Post piece, which opens thusly:

A Russian captured fighting with insurgents in Afghanistan and held for years at a detention facility near Bagram air base will be flown to the United States to be prosecuted in federal court, according to U.S. officials.

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