Latest in Cyber & Technology

Cyber & Technology

NATO Allies Need to Come to Terms With Offensive Cyber Operations

In May 2008, the U.S. Department of Defense and the German Ministry of Defence signed a memorandum of understanding concerning “Cooperation on Information Assurance and Computer Network Defense.” Computer network defense (CND) refers to actions taken on computer networks to monitor and protect those networks. It is not the only memorandum the U.S. Department of Defense has signed with allies on cyber defense.

Cyber & Technology

New U.N. Debate on Cybersecurity in the Context of International Security

In 2018, the United Nations General Assembly voted to establish two separate groups to study international law and norms in relation to cyberspace. Resolution 73/27—proposed by a number of countries, including Russia—created an open-ended working group (OEWG) on the subject.

Congress

What Congress Is (And Isn’t) Doing on 5G

There is near-universal agreement on Capitol Hill about the importance of American leadership in the field of 5G technology as well as the importance of protecting the networks of the United States and its allies’ networks from prying eyes and cyberattacks. There is also consensus that the United States is playing catch-up compared to competitors like China and that more needs to be done. Both the House and the Senate have held hearings addressing 5G this year, and members have used national security-related hearings to raise questions and gather information about 5G.

Cyber & Technology

Announcing the Cyberspace Solarium Commission

The world is facing a new era of technological ubiquity. With 19.4 billion connections globally between internet-enabled devices—1.6 billion of which were added in the last year alone—cyberspace is expanding into every area of life and transforming society at an accelerated pace. And the United States is the most connected nation in the world—which brings opportunities but also increased vulnerabilities. Unfortunately, U.S. politics, laws and national security policy have not kept up with both the risks and the opportunities stemming from the dynamism of technological change.

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