Countering Violent Extremism

U.S. Department of State

Introduced as part of an Obama administration counterterrorism program, the phrase “Countering Violent Extremism” (or “CVE”) refers to a broad spread of ideas and strategies aimed at dissuading and understanding radicalization. CVE initiatives range from academic research on extremist propaganda and the role of religion in violent ideology to civil society programs aimed at reintegrating disaffected youth. Despite its recent popularity, however, CVE faces some notable problems. While some Muslim community leaders view CVE programs as a welcome alternative to police surveillance, other leaders argue that it is simply surveillance by a different name. Perhaps even more seriously, critics have charged that the definition of CVE is so vague as to be almost unformed: what, after all, do we define as “violent extremism”? And what does it really mean to “counter” it?

Latest in Countering Violent Extremism

Countering Violent Extremism

An Abridged History of America’s Terrorism Prevention Programs: Opposition Grows, Supporters Adapt

As the U.S. government faces downsizing in both its terrorism prevention staff and congressional funding, a quiet shift has begun at the local level. The future of CVE programs will be determined by state-level and city initiatives.

Countering Violent Extremism

An Abridged History of America’s Terrorism Prevention Programs: Fits and Starts

There is an ongoing debate within policy circles on when and where countering violent extremism programs began in the U.S. There is, however, little debate on whether the strategy has been implemented effectively. By every objective measure, it has not.

Counterterrorism

Lawfare Resources on Right-Wing Extremism, Domestic Terrorism and De-platforming

On Aug. 4, in Dayton, Ohio, a gunman opened fire and killed nine people. The day before, another shooter killed 22 people in El Paso, Texas, apparently after posting a racist message to the anonymous online forum 8chan decrying an ostensible “Hispanic invasion of Texas.” Though there is no indication so far that the Dayton shooting was motivated by extremist political beliefs, the violence in El Paso is the third mass shooting in 2019 to be linked to 8chan and to some form of far-right extremism.

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