Climate Change and Security

Latest in Climate Change and Security

Climate Change and Security

Biden Orders Immediate Confrontation of Climate Crisis

On Jan. 20, President Joe Biden signed an executive order entitled, “Protecting Public Health and the Environment and Restoring Science to Tackle the Climate Crisis.” It establishes the Biden administration’s commitment to immediately work to confront both the causes and impacts of climate change by implementing policy guided by science.

Climate Change and Security

The Biden Administration and International Climate Change Policy and Action

President-elect Biden is expected to initiate the process of rejoining the Paris Agreement on Inauguration Day. But the hard part will be coming up with a quantitative statement of how and by how much U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases will be reduced over time.

Climate Change and Security

The Oceans Are in Peril—and the IPCC Report Confirms It

During the U.N. General Assembly meeting in mid-September, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the international body for assessing climate science, released its Special Report on Oceans and the Cryosphere. The report provides the most detailed scientific review of how the world’s oceans and cryosphere—the frozen part of the planet—are responding to climate change. The results are not looking good.

Climate Change and Security

China's Pivot on Climate Change and National Security

For decades, China was reluctant to deem climate change a national security issue, preferring instead to view it through the lens of development. The driving concern behind China’s reticence was sovereignty; Beijing feared that crisis rhetoric about climate change would be used to legitimate interventionist actions on the part of Western powers, including forcing Beijing to curtail its economic growth.

Climate Change and Security

Beyond Paris: Other International Efforts to Address Climate Change

The modern economy is built on an international transportation infrastructure that is largely invisible to the consumer. Nearly every banality of modern life, from the clothes people wear to the out-of-season food they eat, is possible only because goods can move easily by air and sea across vast distances, at a low cost.

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