Watergate

Latest in Watergate

The Russia Connection

What to Expect When You’re Expecting a Mueller Report

Once the midterms are past, Americans can resume their reveries about a hypothetical report from the special counsel’s office. There’s no telling how much Robert Mueller knows, but onlookers can speculate about how much the country is likely to find out and how it’s likely to do so. A Mueller Report? A Rosenstein Report? An Impeachment Report? All three?

Secrecy & Leaks

Jaworski Road Map to be Mostly Unsealed

One month ago, the three of us filed a petition in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia for the release of the so-called “Watergate Road Map”—one of the last great still-secret Watergate documents. Last week, Chief Judge Beryl Howell, acting in a separate case, ordered the document’s release.

Executive Power

To Impeach a President: Applying the Authoritative Guide from Charles Black

The most important book ever written on presidential impeachment is only 69 pages long. Charles Black, Jr.,’s Impeachment: A Handbook was published in the summer of 1974, at the height of the Watergate crisis, and reissued in October 1998, two months before Bill Clinton became the second president in U.S. history to be impeached.

Executive Power

FBI Independence—Too Much of a Good Thing?

Andrew Kent argues that in light of President Trump’s attempts to influence the FBI investigation into his campaign’s Russia connections, and his firing of James Comey, Congress should consider giving the director of the FBI greater independence by making him removable only for cause—and with any removal potentially subject to judicial review.

Donald Trump

The “Grand Bargain” at Risk: What’s at Stake When the President Alleges Politics in Intelligence

The U.S. intelligence community is on the verge of a crisis of confidence and legitimacy it has not experienced since the 1970s. Back then, the crisis was one of the community’s own behavior. In the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s the intelligence community used its secret powers of surveillance and other forms of government coercion—often but not always at the behest of its political superiors—to spy on and engage in operations against Americans for political ends.

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