United Nations

Latest in United Nations

Law Enforcement

United Nations Issues Human Rights Guidance for Law Enforcement

The Office of the United Nations High Commission for Human Rights issued new guidance related to “less-lethal weapons” including police batons, tear gas and tasers. The document is addressed to a wide array of stakeholders as it aims to cover all aspects of these weapons from design to use. The document is available here and below.

human rights

United Nations Backslides on Human Rights in Counterterrorism

Human rights and counterterrorism have been dramatically politicized and undermined at the United Nations over the past 18 months. In a spate of recent resolutions, the 47-member Human Rights Council (HRC) in Geneva and the General Assembly in New York have both retreated markedly from many of the hard-won normative gains in their earlier resolutions after 9/11, following concerted lobbying by the likes of Egypt, Algeria and Saudi Arabia—regimes not known for respecting rights in counterterrorism.

AUMF

No Substitute for the Real Thing: International and Congressional Use of Force Authorizations

Since President Truman’s “police action” in the Korean War, scholars in law and political science have considered the possibility that presidents would attempt to substitute congressional authorization with authorization from an international organization when using military force.

Cyber & Technology

New U.N. Debate on Cybersecurity in the Context of International Security

In 2018, the United Nations General Assembly voted to establish two separate groups to study international law and norms in relation to cyberspace. Resolution 73/27—proposed by a number of countries, including Russia—created an open-ended working group (OEWG) on the subject.

International Law

U.N. Security Council Resolution on Protecting People With Disabilities in Armed Conflict

On June 20, the United Nations Security Council passed a unanimous resolution to protect people with disabilities in armed conflict and ensure they have equal access to humanitarian assistance. The groundbreaking text follows extensive advocacy from civil society and disability rights groups, and marks the first time the council has dedicated an entire resolution to the unique challenges people with disabilities face during situations of armed conflict.

Foreign Policy Essay

Militarizing the Peace: UN Intervention Against Congo’s ‘Terrorist’ Rebels

Editor’s Note: The civil war in Congo remains one of the world's bloodiest and most intractable conflicts. In response, the United Nations has authorized a large, and militarily aggressive, campaign to target rebel forces. Rachel Sweet, a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University, argues that this intervention is not working. The UN effort often ignores the dynamics of conflict in Congo, and as a result the use of force fails or even backfires.

Daniel Byman

***

Subscribe to Lawfare

EmailRSSKindle