Steptoe Cyberlaw Podcast

Latest in Steptoe Cyberlaw Podcast

The Cyberlaw Podcast

The Cyberlaw Podcast: Illuminating Supply Chain Security

What is the federal government doing to get compromised hardware and software out of its supply chain? That’s what we ask Harvey Rishikof, coauthor of “Deliver Uncompromised,” and Joyce Corell, who heads the Supply Chain and Cyber Directorate at the National Counterintelligence and Security Center.

Podcasts

The Cyberlaw Podcast: Is Social Media a Disease, and How Do We Treat It?

This week I interview Glenn Reynolds, of Instapundit and the University of Tennessee at Knoxville law school, about his new book, “The Social Media Upheaval.” In a crisp 64 pages, Glenn analogizes social media to a primeval city, where new proximity produces periodic outbreaks of diseases that more isolated people never experienced; traces social media’s toxicity to the desperate pursuit of engagement; and proposes remedies both for individual users

Podcasts

The Cyberlaw Podcast: 'Call Me a Fascist Again and I’ll Get the Government to Shut You up. Worldwide.'

We kick off Episode 267 with Gus Hurwitz reading the runes to see whether a 50-year Chicago winter for antitrust plaintiffs is finally thawing in Silicon Valley. Gus thinks the predictions of global antitrust warming are overhyped.

Podcasts

The Cyberlaw Podcast: Unpacking the Supreme Court’s Decision in 'Pepper v. Apple'

We begin this episode with a quick tour of the Apple antitrust decision that pitted two Trump appointees against each other in a 5-4 decision. Matthew Heiman and I consider the differences in judging styles that produced the split and the role that 25 years of “platform billionaires” may have played in the decision.

Podcasts

The Cyberlaw Podcast: Udderly Indefensible Facial Recognition Scandal May Drive New Privacy Mooovement

Has the Chinese government hired American lawyers to vet its cyberespionage tactics—or just someone who cares about opsec? Probably the latter, and if you’re wondering why China would suddenly care about opsec, look no further than Supermicro’s announcement that it will be leaving China after a Bloomberg story claiming that the company’s supply chain was compromised by Chinese actors.

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