Russia sanctions

Latest in Russia sanctions

Congress

The Senate Foreign Relations Committee’s Conflicting Views on the Role of Sanctions in America’s Strategy Toward Russia

The Senate Foreign Relations Committee’s Dec. 3 hearing on the future of the U.S.-Russia relationship revealed stark differences in lawmakers’ views on the role sanctions should play in Washington’s strategy toward Moscow.

Foreign Policy Essay

Can the Senate Constrain the President on NATO and Russia?

Editors Note: Trump's destruction of U.S. alliances and coddling of Moscow is alarming enough, but even more distressing is the apparent complacency of many powerful Republicans. This may be changing. Molly McKew of the New Media Frontier assesses legislation in the works that would constrain the president on NATO and Russia. If passed, it would mark a major step toward Congress reasserting itself as a foreign policy player.

Daniel Byman

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Sanctions

The Deter Act: Congress’s Latest Effort to Discourage Election Interference

New movement may be afoot on a sanctions bill designed to deter Russian election interference. The bill, the Defending Elections from Threats by Establishing Redlines Act of 2018 (Deter Act), was introduced earlier this year by Sens. Marco Rubio (R.-Fla.) and Chris Van Hollen (D.-Md.).

Foreign Policy Essay

Setting Expectations for the Helsinki Summit

Editor’s Note: The U.S.-Russia relationship is at the center of the Trump administration. At home, the investigation over Russian interference in the 2016 election continues to enrage the president, while abroad Russia appears to be one of the few countries in the world the president respects. So it is not surprising that all eyes are on the Putin-Trump summit. MIT's Carol Saivetz surveys the summit landscape, assessing what might be on the table and how the summit might go.

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Sanctions

Russia, North Korea, Iran: The Comprehensive Sanctions Bill Currently on Trump's Desk

After a long and winding road, both houses of Congress have finally passed a bill which—if signed into law—would essentially require President Trump to impose significant new sanctions, including against Russian interests. On July 28, Congress passed the Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act, and the bill was presented to President Trump.

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