Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board (PCLOB)

Latest in Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board (PCLOB)

Documents

Document: Privacy Oversight Board Report on Signals Intelligence Policy

In response to a Freedom of Information Act request from New York Times reporter Charlie Savage, the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board (PCLOB) has declassified its implementation report on Presidential Policy Directive 28: Signals Intelligence Activities (PPD-28). PPD-28 was signed by President Obama in January of 2014 and provides principles guiding “why, whether, when, and how the United States conducts signals intelligence activities.” The report was sent to Congress in early 2017.

Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board

A Proposed Agenda for a New PCLOB

President Trump recently nominated Travis LeBlanc and Aditya Bamzai as members of the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board (PCLOB), placing a full set of five nominees before the Senate and creating the possibility that the inquorate body could soon be revived. (A quorum requires three members; since early 2017, the body’s only member has been Elisabeth Collins.) This would be a welcome change.

Appointments, Confirmations & Budgets

One PCLOB Nomination to Applaud and Three More to Urge

The nomination of Adam Klein as chairman of the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board (PCLOB) is a welcome move by the president. Klein has excellent credentials for this position, having served as a law clerk to U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia and most recently as a senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security. As readers of this site, to which he is a frequent contributor, know well, Klein is well situated to build upon the solid foundation created by previous PCLOB Chair David Medine.

Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board (PCLOB)

The President's Power (Not) to Nominate Officers? Paralyzing an Agency Through Attrition

There are many tools available to a president who seeks to scale back the scope and authority of an administrative agency. He can push to cut the agency's budget. He can embrace legal theories and litigation strategies that interpret the agency's statutory authority narrowly. He can try to appoint leadership that shares his reductionist agenda (and he can try to remove incumbent leaders who don't). And at the extreme, he might seek legislation formally shrinking the agency's authority or even abolishing the agency outright.

Privacy Paradox

An Easy Win: Replenishing the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board (PCLOB)

With this week’s White House announcement of an intent to nominate additional leadership officials at the Department of Justice, one of whom is current Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board (PCLOB) member Rachel Brand, the PCLOB is one step closer to conducting its business with a lone remaining member, Elisebeth Collins. Board members may not serve in separate U.S. government positions.

Privacy

Near-Death of the PCLOB

The Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board (PCLOB) is a 5-member board tasked with overseeing some aspects of privacy and civil liberties compliance by the Intelligence Community. The former Chairman, David Medine, left in the middle of last year, and no replacement has been named. As this report from the Seattle Times makes clear, another member, Jim Dempsey, will be leaving on January 3 and board member Judge Patrica Wald will retire on January 7.

Privacy

Bellovin Appointed Technology Scholar to PCLOB

Congratulations to my Columbia University colleague Steve Bellovin, who was just appointed as the first Technology Scholar of the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board (announcement here). I've learned a lot from Steve in the years I've known him here on campus. Some readers will be familiar with his work on "lawful hacking" with fellow Lawfarer Susan Landau.

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