Latest in Privacy

Federal Law Enforcement

The Privacy Rights of Terrorism Defendants, Muslim and Non-Muslim

A stated Justice Department policy of protecting the privacy of terrorism defendants is inconsistent with its practice of releasing materials naming Muslim Americans prosecuted in international terrorism-related cases—while rarely publicizing the identities of non-Muslims prosecuted for right-wing extremism.

Hoover Book Soiree

Hoover Book Soiree: Privacy & Power: A Transatlantic Dialogue in the Shadow of the NSA-Affair

The next in our series of book soirees at the Hoover Institution will take place from 5-7 pm on Tuesday, April 18. The event will be a panel discussion featuring Ben, Ralf Poscher, and Russell Miller (editor) on their contributions to a new volume of essays titled Privacy & Power: A Transatlantic Dialogue in the Shadow of the NSA-Affair.

Privacy Paradox

An Easy Win: Replenishing the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board (PCLOB)

With this week’s White House announcement of an intent to nominate additional leadership officials at the Department of Justice, one of whom is current Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board (PCLOB) member Rachel Brand, the PCLOB is one step closer to conducting its business with a lone remaining member, Elisebeth Collins. Board members may not serve in separate U.S. government positions.

Cybersecurity

Political Campaigns and Cybersecurity Risk

Long before recent reports on the (very probable) Russian intelligence-led hack of the Democratic National Committee and public exposure of internal emails, political campaigns were already faced with cybersecurity threats. This post offers some preliminary thoughts on why political campaigns are at risk, and how that risk compares to the risks faced by the private sector.

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