national security strategy

Latest in national security strategy

Podcasts

The Lawfare Podcast: Amy Zegart and Stephen Krasner on ‘Pragmatic Engagement Amidst Global Uncertainty’

This week on the podcast, Lawfare’s Benjamin Wittes interviews Amy Zegart and Stephen Krasner, both of the Hoover Institution, about their recently released national security strategy called Pragmatic Engagement Amidst Global Uncertainty: Three Major Challenges. The document, which was produced by the Hoover Institution’s Working Group

Foreign Policy Essay

Why Strategic Planning Matters to National Security

Editor's Note: Most national security bureaucracies regularly go through time-consuming reviews and strategic planning exercises. Are these efforts valuable? Jordan Tama of American University argues that they are – at least some of the time and under select conditions. Reviews can change policy when an external crisis or failure challenges existing policy and when the president or other senior leaders are directly involved. In addition, they can help bureaucracies achieve buy-in and otherwise sort themselves out.

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Foreign Policy Essay

Governance and Security Sector Assistance: The Missing Link—Part II

Editor's Note: Last week we looked at how the lack of attention to governance has hindered effective U.S. security sector assistance. This week Gordon Adams of American University and Richard Sokolsky of Carnegie take their arguments one step further. First they go into some depth on current U.S. programs and then they offer a new paradigm for assistance that incorporates governance more systematically and offers ideas for how to change U.S. assistance programs.

Foreign Policy Essay

Governance and Security Sector Assistance: The Missing Link—Part I

Editor's Note: We’re breaking new ground here at the Foreign Policy Essaya two-part series. So many of the problems identified in past Foreign Policy Essays and for Lawfare in general revolve directly or indirectly around the question of allied security forces. Competent local security forces can mitigate problems like terrorism and regional stability. Where they work well (let’s say Denmarkwe all like Denmark, right?), then U.S.

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