Latest in Lebanon

Media Criticism

Hezbollah, Drugs, and the Obama Administration: A Closer Look at a Damning Politico Piece

An expose in Politico by Josh Meyer entitled “The secret backstory of how the Obama administration let Hezbollah off the hook” makes a damning charge: “In its determination to secure a nuclear deal with Iran, the Obama administration derailed an ambitious law enforcement campaign targeting drug trafficking by the Iranian-backed terrorist group Hezbollah.” Beyond securing a nuclear deal, the article argues, some Obama administration officials—including John Brennan, the CIA director wh

Foreign Policy Essay

How to Improve Return on Investment for Security Assistance

Editor’s Note: Making other countries more effective U.S. security partners is a vital part of counterterrorism, counterinsurgency and U.S. foreign policy in general. Yet it seems to fail often, and support for such aid appears to be declining. Part of the problem may be in how the United States does such assistance. Stephen Tankel of American University and Melissa Dalton of the Center for Strategic and International Studies argue that the United States should reverse its traditional approach.

Lebanon

Keeping the Peace in Lebanon

Three weeks into President Donald Trump’s already-chaotic tenure, the secretary general of Hezbollah appeared to be feeling good. “When a fool lives in the White House, this is the start of an opening for the world’s oppressed,” Hassan Nasrallah told his followers in a televised address.

Foreign Policy Essay

Seven Reasons Why Lebanon Survives - And Three Reasons Why It Might Not

Editor's Note: What happened in Syria has not stayed in Syria. In 2014, Islamic State forces swept back into Iraq, and terrorism, sectarian tension, and fear have spread throughout much of the Middle East. One bit of good news is to be found in an unexpected place: Lebanon. The Middle East Institute's Paul Salem explains why, so far at least, Lebanon has survived the chaos emanating from Syria.

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Syria Displaced

Dispatch #5: Aksaray and Fatih Neighborhoods

ISTANBUL, Turkey—The Aksaray metro station opens onto a concrete square. All day long, young men and families crisscross the open space. You can hear every dialect of Arabic spoken here: it’s mostly Syrian and Iraqi, but sometimes also Egyptian, Libyan and Moroccan. Men sit the entire day around the edge of the central fountain, waiting—it’s unclear for what.

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