Justice Department

Latest in Justice Department

Justice Department

What’s in the Department of Justice’s Proposals to Congress for Addressing Issues Created by the COVID-19 Pandemic?

The New York Times publicized a package of legislative proposals the Department of Justice submitted to Capitol Hill. What should we make of these new proposals?

Coronavirus

Justice Department Proposes Video Hearings and Delayed Proceedings to Cope With Pandemic

In response to the novel coronavirus pandemic, the Justice Department submitted draft legislation last week asking Congress to implement proposals including allowing judges to toll statutes of limitations during emergencies and relaxing requirements of the Speedy Trial Act. The department also proposes to allow video teleconferencing for preliminary hearings, stating that this would “ensure that defendants are able to access courts shortly after their arrest.”

Mueller Investigation

Department of Justice Letter to House Judiciary Committee Regarding Durham Review

The Justice Department sent a letter to House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler responding to the committee’s request for further information regarding U.S. Attorney John Durham’s review of the Russia investigation. The letter is available here and below.

Federal Law Enforcement

Transnational Organized Crime and National Security

Traditional organized crime, ranging from the Italian-American mafia to street gangs, has long been a target of American law enforcement efforts. Unlike purely domestic organized crime, transnational organized crime, defined by the Justice Department as groups that pursue criminal activities across geographic boundaries, has profound national security implications.

Executive Power

The Trump Administration and Executive Power: Evidence from Justice Department Views Letters

The executive branch has several ways of asserting exclusive presidential powers. Presidential signing statements, memoranda from the Office of Legal Counsel (OLC), legal briefs—these are well-studied tools of executive claims-staking. The use of these tools in the Trump administration has received plenty of coverage on this blog and others.

Federal Law Enforcement

Constitutional Limits on White House Interference in Specific Enforcement Matters

Late last year, in an interview with The New York Times, President Trump declared that he has the “absolute right to do what I want to do with the Justice Department.” In a similar vein, the president’s personal lawyer John Dowd has said that a “president cannot obstruct justice because he is the chief law enforcement officer under [the Constitution’s Article II] and has every right to ex

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