Jeff Sessions

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Podcasts

Rational Security: Jeff Sessions Testifies

Attorney General Jeff Sessions testifies before the Senate Intelligence Committee about his contacts with Russia. New information shows that thirty-nine states were targeted by Russian hackers during the 2016 election. And President Trump gives the military authority to ramp the number of troops in Afghanistan. Plus, my long-time alter ego, Benjamin Sittes, makes an appearance on the show. And the gang says thanks to our super fans.

Podcasts

The Lawfare Podcast, Special Edition: Sessions Versus the Committee with No Bull

Attorney General Jeff Sessions faced questioning from the Senate Intelligence Committee today. He answered questions on his recusal, on his role in James Comey's firing, on his disputed conversation with the former FBI Director, and on his meetings with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak. He also declined to answer a lot of questions about his conversations with President Trump—without an assertion of executive privilege.

We stripped out all the extraneous material, leaving just the questions and answers: no repetition, no senatorial speechifying.

The Russia Connection

Liveblog: Jeff Sessions Testifies Before Senate Intelligence Committee

Today at 2:30 PM Attorney General Jeff Sessions will testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee. He will answer questions about the FBI's ongoing Russia probe and is expected to respond to former FBI Director James Comey's testimony last week.

Follow the livestream here and keep up with our liveblog below. 

Committee Chairman Richard Burr's opening statement is available here.

FBI Director James Comey

Did Attorney General Sessions Violate His Promise to Recuse Himself in Recommending Comey’s Dismissal?

Attorney General Sessions' pledge to recuse himself is expansive enough to cover both the Clinton email investigation and the Russia investigation. But does his involvement in Comey's firing constitute a violation of that pledge?

Aegis

White House Interference with Justice Department Investigations, Part II: The “Reince, What Are You Doing?” Edition

For the second time this week, we have to analyze the propriety of communications between the White House and elements of the Justice Department. The messiness of the allegations pretty neatly sums up why such communications are, as a matter of policy convention, so restricted to begin with.

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