Latest in hacking

cybercrime

FBI Arrests Russian-Based Hacking Platform Owner

FBI officials arrested an alleged Russian hacker, Kirill Firsov, on March 7 in New York City and shut down the cyber platform he operated, according to court documents unsealed Monday. Firsov is the suspected administrator of DEER.IO, a Russian-Based cyber platform that allows criminals to operate “storefronts” and sell illegally-obtained data and personally identifiable information.

Cybersecurity

Hackers Leaked Sensitive Government Data in Argentina—and Nobody Cares

On Monday, Aug. 12, hackers leaked 700 GB of data obtained from the government of Argentina, including confidential documents, wiretaps and biometric information from the Argentine Federal Police, along with the personal data of police officers. The Twitter account of the Argentine Naval Prefecture was hacked as well, and used not only to share links to the stolen information but also to spread fake news about a nonexistent British attack on Argentine ships.

Russia and Eastern Europe

Document: Seven GRU Officers Indicted for Hacking and Disinformation Operations

On Thursday, the Department of Justice unsealed an indictment of seven officers in the GRU, Russia’s military intelligence agency, on charges of computer hacking, wire fraud, aggravated identity theft and money laundering. The charges concern a disinformation operation against international anti-doping agencies in the wake of news reports on the Russian government’s systematic doping of the country’s athletes.

Asia Pacific

Hard Olympic Security Choices: What to Watch for in Pyeongchang

The Olympic games are more than just sport.

The 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea have begun. For two weeks, athletes from around the world will careen down mountains and glide on mirror-perfect ice. But as always, global politics–and the military and security threats behind those politics–lie just beneath the sporting surface.

Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act

D.C. Circuit: Ethiopia Immune from Hacking Suit under the FSIA

Last Tuesday, the D.C. Circuit ruled in Doe v. Ethiopia that Ethiopia cannot be sued in U.S. court for allegedly hacking the computer of a political dissident living in Maryland. The unanimous decision affirmed the district court’s dismissal for lack of subject-matter jurisdiction.

Encryption

The Very Definition of Digital Age Chutzpah

Bloomberg Business is reporting that now that the FBI may have a way into the San Bernadino shooter’s iPhone, Apple wants it to disclose what it’s doing. “Apple lawyers on Monday said that if the case proceeds, the company would want the government to share the nature of the vulnerability it found in the iPhone,” the story reads.

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