Foreign Policy

Latest in Foreign Policy

SinoTech

SinoTech: U.S.-China Trade Talks Continue Against Tense Backdrop

The meeting between President Trump and President Xi Jinping at the G20 summit in Buenos Aires kicked off a slew of activity on the trade war front. On Dec. 1, the two leaders agreed to a 90-day truce during which the United States would delay plans to increase tariffs to 25 percent from ten percent on $200 billion worth of Chinese imports.

Israel-Palestine

Congress Has (Less Than) 60 Days to Save Israeli-Palestinian Security Cooperation

Earlier this fall, Congress enacted a new law with potentially dramatic implications for U.S. foreign policy toward the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The Anti-Terrorism Clarification Act (ATCA) exposes foreign organizations that accept certain forms of U.S. foreign assistance to the possibility of terrorism-related civil litigation in U.S. federal courts.

Asia Pacific

Japan’s Evolving Position on the Use of Force in Collective Self-Defense

The Japanese Constitution was long understood as prohibiting the exercise of international law’s right of collective self-defense under all circumstances. Until just a few years ago, the government’s view had been that the Constitution’s war-renouncing clause, Article 9, permitted only the use of minimum necessary force to defend the territory and population of Japan—not other countries.

South China Sea

Countering China’s Actions in the South China Sea

For many who follow developments in the South China Sea, the July 2016 tribunal ruling in the Philippines’ case against China has become the equivalent of the birth of Jesus in the Gregorian calendar: Developments are considered B.A. and A.A.—Before Award and After Award.

In the first year after the award, compliance was fair: Beijing largely kept its actions, if not its words, within the letter of the ruling.

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