Latest in FISA

Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC)

Summary: Declassified Nov. 2020 FISC Opinion

On April 26, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) declassified a Nov. 18, 2020, ruling issued by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court. The decision grants the U.S. government’s request for approval to continue collecting information on non-U.S. persons in order to acquire foreign intelligence information under Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. 

FISC

To Oversee or to Overrule: What is the Role of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court Under FISA Section 702?

Is the FISC failing its responsibilities with respect to the function it performs in the Section 702 program? Given the role the FISC is intended to play with respect to its oversight of the Section 702 program, the answer is no.

FISA

ODNI Releases FISC Opinion on New Surveillance Technique

The Office of the Director of National Intelligence, in conjunction with the Justice Department, released a March 5 opinion from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court. The opinion pertains to a proposed novel electronic surveillance technique and its compliance with Title I of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. The opinion can be found here and below.

FISA

Justice Department Releases Its Review of FISA Applications Examined by Inspector General

The Justice Department's National Security Division released a review of 29 applications for Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) warrants. The 29 applications had been previously examined by the Justice Department's Office of Inspector General (OIG), which shared its findings in a March report.

FISA

Justice Department Inspector General Finds Broader Pattern of Errors in FISA Applications

A new report released by the Justice Department inspector general found errors or lost information in all of the U.S. Person FISA applications it reviewed following its report on the FBI’s “Crossfire Hurricane” investigation into members of the Trump campaign. Each of the 29 applications reviewed contained inaccuracies, including missing files in four FISA applications and errors or inadequately supported facts in the 25 other applications.

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