economic espionage

Latest in economic espionage

Privacy: Technology

The Cloud Act Is Not a Tool for Theft of Trade Secrets

After last year’s passage of the Clarifying Lawful Overseas Use of Data Act (Cloud Act), officials and journalists in the European Union have ramped up criticism of the American desire for extraterritorial access to electronic evidence, with some accusing the United States of being motivated by the desire to conduct economic espionage for the benefit of U.S. economic interests.

Federal Law Enforcement

Document: Justice Department Charges Chinese and Taiwanese Firms for Economic Espionage

A grand jury in the Northern District of California has returned an indictment against United Microelectronics Corp., a Taiwanese semiconductor manufacturer; Fujian Jinhua, a Chinese state-run enterprise; and three other defendants for theft of trade secrets from Micron Corp., a U.S.-based chipmaker in violation of

Documents

Document: Chinese Intelligence Officer Indicted and Extradited to U.S. for Spying on Aviation Companies

The Justice Department has unsealed an indictment against Yanjun Xu, a Chinese intelligence officer, on four counts of conspiring and attempting to commit economic espionage and to steal trade secrets from U.S. aviation and aerospace companies. Xu was arrested in Belgium on April 1 and was extradited to the United States yesterday. According to the indictment, Xu targeted leading aviation companies inside and outside the United States, including GE Aviation.
Cybersecurity and Deterrence

Private Sector Cyber Intelligence Could Be Key to Workable Cyber Arms Control Treaties

Skepticism abounded both inside and outside of government when then-President Barack Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping included special provisions for reducing commercial cyber espionage in their far-reaching September 2015 bilateral agreement.

Foreign Policy Essay

Sanctioning the Dragon: Using Statecraft to Shape Chinese Behavior

Editor's Note: Sanctions on China are again in the air as policymakers look on Beijing's provocative regional policies with dismay. Although many experts argue that sanctions would achieve little and might even backfire, Zack Cooper and Eric Lorber, at CSIS and the Financial Integrity Network respectively, argue that limited and targeted sanctions can make China more hesitant to engage in aggressive behavior.

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