Domestic Terrorism

Latest in Domestic Terrorism

Federal Law Enforcement

The Privacy Rights of Terrorism Defendants, Muslim and Non-Muslim

The official position of the Department of Justice—according to a legal brief filed in February—is that association with a terrorism charge is so stigmatizing that defendants should not be publicly identified, even after conviction. Doing so would lead to “harassment, embarrassment, barriers to reintegration and renewed public attention.” It might even expose defendants to “the potential for violence or renewed contact” by extremist groups “plotting future terrorist attacks or intimidating witnesses.”

Federal Law Enforcement

It’s Time for Congress to Make Domestic Terrorism a Federal Crime

On Oct. 27, Robert Bowers launched an attack on the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh, Penn., murdering 11 worshipers and injuring many others. The federal indictment against Bowers charges him with multiple counts of obstructing, by force and threat of force, “the free exercise of religious beliefs” resulting in death and bodily injury and involving the use of a dangerous weapon and attempts to kill.

Documents

Document: Trump's Tweets Preclude Death Penalty in Saipov Case, Defense Argues

Attorneys for Sayfullo Saipov, who is accused of killing eight people and injuring 12 others in a vehicular terrorist attack in New York City last Halloween, have petitioned the government to preclude the death penalty again their client or appoint an independent prosecutor to decide whether the death penalty should be pursued.

Domestic Terrorism

Document: Charlottesville Vehicle Attacker Charged for Federal Hate Crimes

A federal grand jury returned James Alex Fields Jr. a 30-count indictment after he drove his car into a group of protestors at the August 2017 “Unite the Right Rally” in Charlottesville, Va., killing Heather Heyer. The charges include 29 counts of hate crimes and one count of racially motivated violent interference. The Justice Department released a press release on Wednesday.

Domestic Terrorism

Criminal Law Should Treat Domestic Terrorism as the Moral Equivalent of International Terrorism

In the last year, it appears that the vehicle has become a new “weapon of choice” for international terrorists. Whether a cargo truck deliberately driven into the crowds of people celebrating Bastille Day in Nice in July 2016, a tractor-trailer that plowed into a Berlin Christmas market in December 2016, the car and van attacks in London at the Palace of Westminster and London Bridge in March and June of this year, or last Thursday’s van attack in Barcelona, this low-cost, low-planning method of spreading terror has produced high-fatality, high-impact results.

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