Latest in CVE

Foreign Policy Essay

Is President Trump Enabling the Islamic State’s Power of Persuasion?

Editor’s Note: Terrorists' use of the Internet in all its forms remains an important source of their power and influence. Michael Smith, an analyst focusing on jihadist influence operations, calls for a much more aggressive set of government policies and laws to push technology companies to do more for counterterrorism. Although many analysts contend technology companies have upped their game, Smith argues that there is far, far more to be done.

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Foreign Policy Essay

Marginalizing Violent Extremism Online

Editor’s Note: The call to take down terrorist-linked content on the Internet is both sensible and limited in its effectiveness. Terrorists use many different aspects of the Internet for many different purposes, and taking down propaganda and hostile accounts is not enough to stop the effectiveness of their strategies. Audrey Alexander and Bill Braniff, of GWU and Maryland respectively, call for a different approach. They argue for going after more portions of the terrorists' online ecosystem, expanding the campaign, and thinking more broadly about the problem.

Foreign Policy Essay

Children of the Caliphate: Victims or Threat?

Editor’s Note: Of the many horrible things the Islamic State has done, one of the worst is its indoctrination of children and use of them in its gruesome deeds. The children are both victims and perpetrators. Governments have a responsibility to care for them yet must also guard against possible threats they may pose. Robin Simcox of the Heritage Foundation lays out the challenges ahead for several European states, as well as how they might confront this knotty problem.

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Foreign Policy Essay

What CVE Can Learn from Guerrilla Marketing

Editor’s Note: The Islamic State is weakened militarily, but many of the ideas it champions remain strong. In addition, the group continues to spread its message both virtually and in face-to-face settings. Katerina Papatheodorou of GWU's Program on Extremism argues that the United States and its allies can, and must, do better at blending online and offline efforts as part of their strategy to counter violent extremism.

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Foreign Policy Essay

When It Comes to CVE, the United States Stands to Learn a Lot from Others. Will It?

Editor’s Note: Programs to counter violent extremism (known as “CVE”) attempt to offer non-military and non-law enforcement means to fight terrorism, working with communities to identify potential radicals and move them away from violence. Critics who have the ear of the Trump administration deride them as weak and ineffective, and programs at DHS and other agencies are on the chopping block. Eric Rosand, a non-resident fellow at Brookings and the director of the Prevention Project, calls for renewing U.S. CVE efforts.

Foreign Policy Essay

How Should the Trump Administration Respond to Right-Wing Extremism?

Editor’s Note: The neo-Nazi protests in Charlottesville and the killing of a counter-protester highlighted to Americans what terrorism watchers have long known: Right-wing extremism in the United States is alive and dangerous. Trump's election appears to have invigorated the movement, and the attention given to Charlottesville may strengthen it even more. Assuming the president wants to fight this movementwhich for now, alas, is just an assumptionwhat should he do?

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