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Podcasts

The Lawfare Podcast: Congressman Adam Schiff on the Future of the House Intelligence Committee

On January 3, Democrats will take control of the House of Representatives and all of its committees. Congressman Adam Schiff of California, the current ranking member on the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence (HPSCI), is expected to take control of the committee. This week, Susan Hennessey and Benjamin Wittes sat down with Rep. Schiff at his office to discuss the agenda for HPSCI and the upcoming Congress, the challenges facing the Democratic majority as they attempt to rebuild bipartisanship on a deeply divided committee, and, of course, the Russia investigation.

 

Federal Law Enforcement

Document: U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of New York and Special Counsel's Office File Michael Cohen Sentencing Memo

Today, the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of New York filed its sentencing memo in the Michael Cohen case. The sentencing memo from SDNY is available here and the memo from the special counsel's office is available here. Both are below: 

Memo from the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of New York: 

Trade and Security

Huawei Arrest Raises Thorny Questions of Law Enforcement and Foreign Policy

Canadian authorities arrested the CFO of Chinese telecom Huawei at the request of the United States. The high-profile arrest comes against the backdrop of sensitive trade negotiations and U.S. government concerns about the potential national security threat posed by Huawei.

The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast: Special Edition: Preet Bharara Discusses…Everything

Today Benjamin Wittes got on the phone with former U.S. attorney and podcast empresario Preet Bharara to discuss a recent report Preet has published along with the National Task Force on Rule of Law & Democracy, a group which Preet co-chairs along with former New Jersey governor Christine Todd Whitman.

Donald Trump

Document: Don't Take Trump's Tweets Literally, Justice Department Argues

The Department of Justice submitted an unusual court filing in litigation over the release of the Carter Page FISA, arguing that the president's statements on Twitter concerning the Page FISA should not be assumed to be accurate or based on the president's personal knowledge of the underlying issue. The document, which was filed on Nov. 30 and first flagged by USA Today reporter Brad Heath, is available here and below.

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