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Podcasts

The Lawfare Podcast: It's Not Too Late to Deter China From Invading Taiwan

Last week, the United States and the Philippines reached an agreement to expand U.S. military operations in the Philippines to deter China's increasingly aggressive actions toward Taiwan and in the South China Sea. The news was sandwiched between Air Force General Mike Minihan predicting that U.S. confrontation with China may happen as early as 2025 and Secretary Antony Blinken postponing his trip to China after a Chinese surveillance balloon was detected flying over the United States. 

Podcasts

The Lawfare Podcast: The CLOUD Act Five Years Later

Next month will mark the five-year anniversary of the CLOUD Act, a foundational piece of legislation on cross-border data transfers and criminal investigations. Before he was a University of Minnesota law professor and senior editor at Lawfare, Alan Rozenshtein worked in the Department of Justice where he was a member of the team that developed the CLOUD Act. In that capacity, he interacted with representatives from the large tech companies that would be most directly affected by the law.

Chatter

The Chatter Podcast: M. Todd Bennett on the Secretive Story of the Glomar Explorer

Shane Harris spoke with intelligence historian M. Todd Bennett to discuss his new book, "Neither Confirm nor Deny: How the Glomar Mission Shielded the CIA from Tranpsarency," on how the exposure of a CIA secret program, codenamed AZORIAN, led to a public backlash against disclosures of classified information and helped reenforce the culture of secrecy that envelops the CIA's world.

National Security Strategy

Civilian Harm Mitigation: An Opportunity for Values-Based U.S. Leadership at NATO

A robust new U.S. push to mitigate civilian harm in conflict serves as a signal for NATO to get serious about implementing its approach to human security, but most recently, Ukraine reinforces the broader and more integrated approach championed by NATO allies.

Podcasts

The Lawfare Podcast: 'Come to This Court and Cry: How the Holocaust Ends,' with Linda Kinstler and Sam Moyn

Last December, a German court convicted a 97-year-old former Nazi camp secretary of complicity in the murder of more than 10,000 people in what the media called—once again—the last Nazi trial. After almost eight decades, the Holocaust is still being litigated, remembered, and all-too-often misremembered.

The National Security Law Podcast

The National Security Law Podcast: If You Go to Washington Don't Crime There

What’s this, a one-week turnaround between shows?  Will wonders never cease? In a throwback to the days of this being a weekly show, your co-hosts Bobby Chesney and Steve Vladeck are back on a quick turnaround in order to debate and discuss:

International Law

The U.N. Cybercrime Convention Should Not Become a Tool for Political Control or the Watering Down of Human Rights

Negotiations for a U.N. cybercrime convention have entered a critical stage. U.N. member states disagree on what “cybercrime” means and what should be the human rights safeguards of the future convention.

Podcasts

The Lawfare Podcast: Even More Classified Documents

It seems like everyone has classified documents stashed away these days. First, it was Donald Trump, with the Justice Department investigation into documents stored improperly at Mar-a-Lago. Then, it was Joe Biden, with news that documents bearing classification markings were found at Biden’s Wilmington home and at the Penn Biden Center. And now, former Vice President Mike Pence has also uncovered classified materials at his home. What on earth is going on?

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