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Lawfare: Administrative

Call for Papers: The University of Texas at Austin Announces the 2021 'Bobby R. Inman Award' for Student Scholarship on Intelligence

The Intelligence Studies Project of The University of Texas at Austin announces the 7th annual competition recognizing outstanding student research and writing on topics related to intelligence and national security. 

Podcasts

The Lawfare Podcast: Biden Announces a Military Withdrawal from Afghanistan

On Wednesday, President Biden announced a full withdrawal of all U.S. military personnel from Afghanistan by September 11, 2021, an announcement that comes as the U.S. and Afghan governments have been trying to reach a power sharing agreement with the Taliban. Prior to the withdrawal announcement, Bryce Klehm spoke with Thomas Gibbons-Neff, a New York Times correspondent based in the Kabul bureau and a former Marine infantryman, who walked us through the situation on the ground in Afghanistan over the last year. Following Biden's announcement, Bryce spoke with Madiha Afzal, the David M.

Podcasts

The Lawfare Podcast: Twitter, Facial Recognition and the First Amendment

This week on Arbiters of Truth, the Lawfare Podcast’s miniseries on our online information ecosystem, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Jameel Jaffer and Ramya Krishnan of the Knight First Amendment Institute. 

What do facial recognition software and President Trump’s erstwhile Twitter habits have in common? They both implicate the First Amendment—and hint at how old doctrines struggle to adapt to new technologies. 

Podcasts

Rational Security: 'The Longest War is Ending' Edition

President Biden announces that all U.S. military forces will be out of Afghanistan by Sept. 11. A blackout at an Iranian nuclear facility is widely attributed to Israeli sabotage, complicating negotiations over a new nuclear deal. And we finally know the company that helped the FBI hack a notorious shooter’s phone.  

ChinaTalk

ChinaTalk: 'Invisible China': How the Urban-Rural Divide Threatens China’s Ris‪e‬

Scott Rozelle (legend, Stanford professor, co-director of the Stanford Center on China's Economy and Institutions) joins ChinaTalk to discuss his recent book, "Invisible China: How the Urban-Rural Divide Threatens China’s Rise," co-authored with Natalie Hell. We discuss how China’s 900 million-strong low-income population will decide China’s future development path. Is China is the next Mexico? Why is it easy to solve poverty but not low income? Why don’t local governments spend enough on rural education and health?

Podcasts

The Lawfare Podcast: Identifying and Exploiting the Weaknesses of White Supremacist Groups

A lot of people are expressing anxiety about white supremacist violent terrorism, yet in a new Brookings paper entitled "Identifying and Exploiting the Weaknesses of the White Supremacist Movement," Daniel Byman, Lawfare's foreign policy editor and a senior fellow at the Brookings Center for Middle East Policy, and Mark Pitcavage, a senior research fellow at the Center on Extremism at the Anti-Defamation League, say that while the threat is r

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