Kenneth Anderson

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Kenneth Anderson is a professor at Washington College of Law, American University; a visiting fellow of the Hoover Institution; and a non-resident senior fellow of the Brookings Institution. He writes on international law, the laws of war, weapons and technology, and national security; his most recent book, with Benjamin Wittes, is "Speaking the Law: The Obama Administration's Addresses on National Security Law."

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Events

The 19th Annual Grotius Lecture at the ASIL Annual Meeting: Civil War Time from Grotius to the Global War on Terror

Next week is the annual meeting of the American Society of International Law in Washington DC. For nearly 20 years, the meeting has begun with the distinguished Grotius Lecture, which takes place on the opening night of the conference. The Grotius Lecture is co-sponsored by ASIL and (I’m pleased to add) my law school, Washington College of Law.

Readings

What Are the Implications of Emerging Technologies in AI-Driven Robotics and Automation for Globalization?

Last month I attended an outstanding workshop at the University of Pennsylvania’s newly-established Perry World House on a topic that (as far as I can tell) has not received the attention it should: the intersection of emerging technologies with globalization.

Readings

Alan Z. Rozenshtein on Digital Communications and Data Storage Companies as "Surveillance Intermediaries"

Alan Z. Rozenshtein, a former contributor to this site who now works at the Department of Justice, is well known to long-time Lawfare readers for his writing on many national security law topics, particularly on issues of national security law in cyber-related topics. Alan has just posted to SSRN a very interesting and important article on the issues raised by government surveillance in an era that today is perhaps most memorably characterized by the legal standoff between Apple and the Department of Justice over unlocking the cell phone of one of the San Bernardino terrrorists.

Cyber & Technology

Challenges for the U.S. Military in Designing and Deploying Self-Driving Vehicles

An observation made in the briefing report War-Algorithm Accountability (featured in a Readings post last week) is that weapons are not the only military systems increasingly defined by algorithms, automation, and autonomy. Nor are weapons the only military system that, if significantly automated or programmed to act autonomously, raises issues of reliability, safety, and accountability.