Jonathan Zittrain

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Jonathan Zittrain is the George Bemis Professor of International Law at Harvard Law School and the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, Professor of Computer Science at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Director of the Harvard Law School Library, and Co-Founder of the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society. His research interests include the ethics and governance of artificial intelligence; battles for control of digital property; the regulation of cryptography; new privacy frameworks for loyalty to users of online services; the roles of intermediaries with in Internet architecture; and the useful and unobtrusive deployment of technology in education. He is currently focused on the ethics and governance of artificial intelligence and teaches a course on the topic. His book, "The Future of the Internet -- And How to Stop It", predicted the end of general purpose client computing and the corresponding rise of new gatekeepers.

His writing here and elsewhere represents his individual, independent views.

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Cybersecurity

New Strategies for Securing Our Private Lives

I recently wrote an essay reflecting on the reality that nearly anyone with a life online is today subject to being hacked and having anything private become public.

If the media is understandably going to publish newsworthy stuff, regardless of its provenance, and people are going to continue to use email and other communications that leave a record, what should be done?

There are some tactical short term ways to mitigate risk.

Cybersecurity

The Good News and the Troubling News: We’re Not Going Dark

Just over a year ago, with support from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University convened a diverse group of security and policy experts from academia, civil society, and the U.S. intelligence community to begin to work through some of the particularly vexing and enduring problems of surveillance and cybersecurity.