Jacques Singer-Emery

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Jacques Singer-Emery is a student at Harvard Law School and previously spent four years in the New York Police Department (NYPD), first as a policy advisor to Police Commissioner Bratton and then as a Case Analyst for the NYPD Intelligence Bureau. He is the Editor-in-Chief of the National Security Law Journal and a researcher for Professor Philip Heymann and Professor Blum. Jacques graduated Magna Cum Laude from Princeton University in 2013.

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Military Commissions

Update From the Military Commissions: A Big September in the 9/11 Case

Last month, the military commission for the matter of United States v. Khalid Shaikh Mohammad et al. (i.e., the 9/11 trial) held a marathon three weeks of nearly back-to-back hearings. After being held up by delays in the publication and release of relevant transcripts, this post summarizes these proceedings and identifies several areas of potential interest, including testimony from two FBI special agents regarding their interviews with the defendants and their prior knowledge of alleged torture by the CIA.

September 9

Military Commissions

Update on the Military Commissions: Continued Health Issues, Recusal Motion and a New Cell in 'al-Iraqi'

The military commission trying alleged al-Qaeda commander Abd al-Hadi al-Iraqi reconvened Aug. 21-28. You can find previous Lawfare coverage here and here.

Civil Liberties and Constitutional Rights

Summary: Government’s Management of the Terrorist Screening Database Violates Citizens’ Constitutional Rights, Court Rules

On Sept. 4, the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia issued a decision in Elhady v. Kable—a case that challenges how the federal government manages the Terrorist Screening Database (TSDB), colloquially known as the “watchlist.” Judge Anthony Trenga’s opinion granted the plaintiffs’ motion for summary judgment and found that U.S.

Today's Headlines and Commentary

Today's Headlines and Commentary

The United Arab Emirates (UAE) said on Sunday that four commercials vessels had been sabotaged off its coast, and Saudi Arabia claimed that two of of its oil tankers were among the attacked ships, Reuters said. The culprit and nature of the attack have not been reported, but the Saudi government alleged the attack was an attempt to undermine the security of global crude supplies as tensions rise between the United States and Iran.