James Kraska

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James Kraska is Chair and Charles H. Stockton Professor of International Maritime Law in the Stockton Center for International Law at the U.S. Naval War College, where he is a tenured full professor. He is also a Visiting Professor of Law and John Harvey Gregory Lecturer on World Organization at Harvard Law School, where he teaches International Law of the Sea. He is also Distinguished Fellow at the Law of the Sea Institute, University of California Berkeley School of Law, a Permanent Member of the Council on Foreign Relations and U.S. representative to the International Group of Experts for the San Remo Manual on the Law Applicable to Armed Conflicts at Sea, produced by the International Institute of Humanitarian Law. Kraska is Editor-in-Chief of "Benedict on Admiralty: International Maritime Law" and co-author of the forthcoming, "Emerging Technology and the Law of the Sea" (Oxford University Press).

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South China Sea

The US-China Arrangement for Air-to-Air Encounters Weakens International Law

As part of the September 2015 fanfare visit by Xi Xinping to the United States, the United States and China signed an arrangement on rules of behavior for safety of air-to-air encounters of military aircraft. The deal is supposed to avert aviation incidents in international airspace between military aircraft of the United States and China. In a deadly 2001 incident, for example, a Chinese F-8 fighter jet interceptor collided with a U.S.

Maritime

Submarines and the Law of Espionage

It has been apparent for several years that the navies in the Asia-Pacific are on the greatest submarine development and acquisition spree since before World War II. Most states that operate submarines plan to expand their force, including Japan from 16 to 22 boats; Australia from 8 to 12, and China, from about 60 now to more than 70 by 2020.

South China Sea

Can’t Anybody Play This Game? US FON Operations and Law of the Sea

The United States has been unable to synchronize successful air and sea freedom of navigation (FON) operations in the South China Sea with an erratic diplomatic message and a legal case that is too clever by half. Our colleagues Bonnie Glaser and Peter Dutton tried to reconnect these dimensions when they wrote in the The National Interest that while the administration has not done a “stellar job of explaining its actions,” the U.S.

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