Jane Chong

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Jane Chong is former deputy managing editor of Lawfare. She served as a law clerk on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit and is a graduate of Yale Law School and Duke University.

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Donald Trump

Impeachment-Proof? The President's Unconstitutional Abuse of His Constitutional Powers

In September, I identified four myths that dog discussions about presidential impeachment. Perhaps the most persistent and surprisingly consequential of these myths is the notion that impeachment and removal decisions amount to pure politics, as opposed to a set of legal determinations made by a political branch.

Privacy

Justice Department Fights Web Hosting Company for Trump Protester Information

The Justice Department is fighting for information on all of the visitors to the website disruptj20.org, as well as log files on when and from where the visitors logged onto the site, what they looked at, and emails related to the site. The site at the center of the storm bills itself as a platform connecting Trump protesters and "support[ing] the massive and spontaneous eruption of resistance across the United States that’s happened since the election."

Executive Power

To Impeach a President: Applying the Authoritative Guide from Charles Black

The most important book ever written on presidential impeachment is only 69 pages long. Charles Black, Jr.,’s Impeachment: A Handbook was published in the summer of 1974, at the height of the Watergate crisis, and reissued in October 1998, two months before Bill Clinton became the second president in U.S. history to be impeached.

The Russia Connection

The Wall Begins to Crumble: Notes on Collusion

The Trump White House’s key defensive wall has developed some major cracks.

Ever since the first revelations of L’Affaire Russe, President Trump and his defenders have insisted that there’s no evidence of “collusion” between Russian operatives and either the Trump campaign or the candidate himself.