Darrell West

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Darrell M. West is vice president and director of Governance Studies and holds the Douglas Dillon Chair. He is Co-Editor-in-Chief of TechTank. His current research focuses on artificial intelligence, robotics, and the future of work. West is also director of the John Hazen White Manufacturing Initiative.

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TechTank

TechTank: Which U.S. Cities Are Poised for AI Growth?

AI is generating a lot of interest all around the world. It is a way to spur innovation, develop new products and services, and increase economic development. Many places see it as the engine of economic growth and technological innovation.

But there is tremendous variation across local and regional economies in how well-positioned cities are as the AI economy grows. Some metropolitan areas have tremendous assets and lots of AI-related activity while others see little activity.

TechTank

TechTank: Why State Unemployment Insurance Programs Failed Workers During the COVID-19 Pandemic

We live in a time of digital transformation. Technology is altering how we work, learn and access public services. At the same time, shifts taking place in the workforce are changing how people navigate complexities in information technology, human resources and social service delivery.

TechTank

TechTank: The Facebook Oversight Board’s Decision on Banning Trump

Should a powerful technology company such as Facebook have the power to ban public officials from its platform?

On Jan. 7, the day after a mob stormed the U.S. Capitol building, Facebook temporarily banned then-President Donald Trump on the grounds that he had used a video and online statement to incite violence. Since then, the company referred the Trump case to an oversight board composed of 20 independent experts to determine whether to make the ban permanent and to provide guidance for other world leaders.

TechTank

TechTank: What We Can Learn About Mars From the Perseverance Exploration?

In February, the latest U.S. rover named Perseverance landed on Mars and began what is expected to be a historic exploration of the Red Planet. Equipped with high-resolution cameras, microphones, drills, scoopers and a helicopter, the mission aims to find evidence of microbial life from 3.5 billion years and decipher what happened to that planet. Already, Perseverance is navigating its landing spot in Jezero Crater, finding rocks that appear to have been molded by water and wind, taking pictures of volcanic rocks, and starting to move around the crater.