Bruce Schneier

BSchneier's picture

Bruce Schneier is a security technologist. He is the author of 14 books—including "Click Here to Kill Everybody: Security and Survival in a Hyper-connected World"—as well as hundreds of articles, essays, and academic papers. His newsletter “Crypto-Gram” and blog “Schneier on Security” are read by over 250,000 people. Schneier is a fellow and lecturer at Harvard Kennedy School a fellow at the Berkman-Klein Center for Internet and Society, a board member of the Electronic Frontier Foundation and Access Now, and a Special Advisor to IBM Security.

Subscribe to this Lawfare contributor via RSS.

Going Dark

The Myth of Consumer Security

The Department of Justice wants access to encrypted consumer devices but promises not to infiltrate business products or affect critical infrastructure. Yet that's not possible, because there is no longer any difference between those categories of devices. Consumer devices are critical infrastructure. They affect national security. And it would be foolish to weaken them, even at the request of law enforcement.

Cyber & Technology

When Fake News Comes to Academia

The term “fake news” has lost much of its meaning, but it describes a real and dangerous internet trend. Because it’s hard for many people to differentiate a real news site from a fraudulent one, they can be hoodwinked by fictitious news stories pretending to be real. The result is that otherwise reasonable people believe lies.

The trends fostering fake news are more general, though, and we need to start thinking about how it could affect different areas of our lives. In particular, I worry about how it will affect academia. In addition to fake news, I worry about fake research.

Cybersecurity and Deterrence

Information Attacks on Democracies

Democracy is an information system.

That's the starting place of our new paper: “Common-Knowledge Attacks on Democracy.” In it, we look at democracy through the lens of information security, trying to understand the current waves of Internet disinformation attacks. Specifically, we wanted to explain why the same disinformation campaigns that act as a stabilizing influence in Russia are destabilizing in the United States.

Russia and Eastern Europe

Censorship in the Age of Large Cloud Providers

Internet censors have a new strategy in their bid to block applications and websites: pressuring the large cloud providers that host them. These providers have concerns that are much broader than the targets of censorship efforts, so they have the choice of either standing up to the censors or capitulating in order to maximize their business. Today’s internet largely reflects the dominance of a handful of companies behind the cloud services, search engines and mobile platforms that underpin the technology landscape.