Amy Zegart

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Amy Zegart is the Davies Family Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, a professor of political science (by courtesy) at Stanford University, and co-director of Stanford’s Center for International Security and Cooperation. She teaches and writes about intelligence challenges, congressional oversight, and national security policy. Her books include Spying Blind: The CIA, the FBI and the Origins of 9/11, and Flawed by Design, which chronicles the development of the CIA, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and National Security Council. From 1999 to 2011, she was a public policy professor at UCLA. She also spent four years as a McKinsey & Company management consultant. Follow her on Twitter @AmyZegart

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Cyber & Technology

Policymakers are from Mars, Tech Company Engineers are from Venus

This week, Herb Lin and I are giving a joint talk about the suit-hoodie divide, and whether relations between Washington and Silicon Valley are getting worse (I think the answer is yes). Part of the problem stems from conflicting interests and serious differences of opinion about policy. But a large part of the problem—and perhaps the hardest and most hidden part—stems from cultural differences. I don't want to overstate here. Culture is squishy. It's hard to see, hard to measure, hard to articulate, hard to change.
Surveillance: Snowden NSA Controversy

Real Spies, Fake Spies, NSA, and More: What My 2012 and 2013 National Polls Reveal

In August 2012, thanks to YouGov, I launched my first national survey to probe more deeply about what Americans know about intelligence agencies, what they think about controversial intelligence programs, and where those attitudes come from. In light of the Edward Snowden revelations, last month I asked YouGov to run another poll that asked some of the same questions, along with new ones about NSA so that I could start tracking trends over time. The poll ran Oct. 5-7, 2013, and included 1,000 people (with a margin of error of +/- 4.3 percent).