Ariane Tabatabai

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Ariane Tabatabai is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Security Studies at the Georgetown University Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, a Senior Associate with the Center for Strategic and International Studies, and a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center, where she was a Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow in 2013-14 and an Associate in 2014-15.

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Foreign Policy Essay

The Fruits of Iran’s Victory in Syria

Editor’s Note: Syria's civil war has many losers, but Iran is not one of them. Tehran backed its ally in Damascus to the hilt from the start of the civil war, and its ally survived in large part because of Iran's aid. Ariane Tabatabai of Georgetown explains the reasons for Iran's involvement and the strategic and economic benefits Tehran has gained.

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Foreign Policy Essay

Afghanistan: Another Victory for Tehran?

Editor’s Note: Iran's support for Syria, presence in Iraq, and enmity toward Irael and U.S. Arab allies is the focus of most U.S. attention. Afghanistan, where Iran plays a major role, is often neglected. As the Trump administration weighs its options there, it would do well to recognize Tehran's ability to do harm. Ariane Tabatabai, my Georgetown colleague, explains Iran's complex calculus in Afghanistan and why the United States might find opportunities as well as dangers.

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Foreign Policy Essay

Understanding the Iran Nuclear Deal through the Lens of the Iran-Iraq War

Editor’s Note: The Obama administration's nuclear deal with Iran remains one of its most important, and most contentious, foreign-policy legacies. Much of the controversy in the United States stems from the question of whether Iran might cheat, but Iran is worried that Washington might renege on its side of the bargain.

Foreign Policy Essay

Defusing the Iran-Saudi Powder Keg

Editor’s Note: The Iran-Saudi rivalry has fostered instability throughout the Middle East, with neither side likely to emerge triumphant. This rivalry increases bloodshed in the region and hinders U.S. attempts to secure its interests. Ariane Tabatabai of Georgetown and Dina Esfandiary of King's College assess the problems caused by the Iran-Saudi rivalry and argue that dialogue now is both possible and necessary.

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Foreign Policy Essay

Will Trump Make Iran His Partner or His Adversary?

Editor’s Note: Of all the many uncertainties about Trump's foreign policy, the question of Iran looms among the largest. The Obama administration moved U.S.-Iran relations from abysmal to bad, and both Republicans and Democrats heavily criticized the Iran nuclear deal, the most important element of this limited rapprochement. Yet Iran is an important player in the region, and the Trump administration must carefully consider their first step if they seek to confront Tehran or continue limited cooperation.

Foreign Policy Essay

Iran and Its Iraqi Shi'a Allies

Editor's Note: As the Islamic State is driven from Mosul, Iraqis and the the country's neighbors are wondering who will take the group's place. The Iraqi government is weak, and Iranian-backed Shi'a militias have proven a powerful force in the country. The good news is that they fight the Islamic State; the bad news is that they are often more loyal to Tehran than to the U.S.-backed government in Baghdad. Ariane Tabatabai of Georgetown examines the relationship between Iran and these groups, explaining Tehran's goals and the limits to its influence.

Foreign Policy Essay

Partnering with Iran to Counter ISIS?

Editor's Note: The U.S. struggle against the Islamic State is hamstrung by too many enemies and too few allies. Not only is the United States fighting the Islamic State, but it also opposes the Syrian regime, Lebanese Hizballah, and Iran, among other forces. Ariane Tabatabai of Georgetown and Dina Esfandiary of King's College argue that U.S. policy is at least partly misguided. They contend that Iran can and should be a major ally in the struggle against the Islamic State.

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