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Tag Archives: Washington Post

Edward Snowden: Civil Liberties Violator

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Monday, July 7, 2014 at 11:56 PM

A government contractor steals tens of thousands of highly-sensitive communications intercepts. The communications have national security implications, yes, but put that aside for now. They also involve the most intimate details of the lives of thousands of people: their love letters, their pictures of their kids, their pictures of themselves in lingerie, records reflecting their . . .
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A Quick Read of the Post’s Latest NSA Story

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Sunday, July 6, 2014 at 11:14 AM

The Washington Post has a dramatic new NSA story today, one that is qualitatively different from any of the previous Edward Snowden revelations. Written by Barton Gellman, Julie Tate, and Ashkan Soltani, the story describes a large cache of intercepted communications (roughly 160,000 email and instant message exchanges) and the benefits and privacy costs of . . .
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Why Imminence? The Assassinations Ban and that OLC Al-Aulaqi Memo

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Thursday, June 26, 2014 at 1:44 PM

The other day, I tried to read the tea leaves and figure out where the notion of “imminent threat” comes from in the administration’s legal views of targeted killing. I speculated that the source of the “imminent” threat standard may well be language in the presidential covert action findings authorizing the CIA’s broad campaign against Al Qaeda . . .
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The Washington Post and Guardian Pulitzers: I Dissent

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Tuesday, April 15, 2014 at 8:30 AM

I know it is rude and churlish to offer anything but warm congratulations when former colleagues win a major prize—much less journalism’s most prestigious award. I know I am courting a barrage of hostile tweets and emails with these words. I know as well that I am on the losing end of elite opinion on these . . .
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WaPo on the Scope of NSA’s Telephone Metadata Collection

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Friday, February 7, 2014 at 11:19 AM

This just in from the Post’s Ellen Nakashima: The National Security Agency is collecting less than 30 percent of all Americans’ call records because of an inability to keep pace with the explosion in cellphone use, according to current and former U.S. officials. The disclosure contradicts popular perceptions that the government is sweeping up virtually all domestic phone data. . . .
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The Effect of the Proposed Repeal of the 2002 Iraq AUMF

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Friday, January 10, 2014 at 3:07 PM

The Washington Post reports that Senator Paul “plans to introduce legislation to repeal the use-of-force resolution that paved the way for the Iraq war,” and notes that President Obama supports the repeal of the Iraq AUMF.  The 2002 Iraq AUMF authorizes the President to use necessary and appropriate force to “(1) defend the national security . . .
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Eugene Robinson Gets it Wrong on Drones

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Tuesday, December 3, 2013 at 7:53 AM

Over at the Washington Post, columnist Eugene Robinson has a piece decrying the morality of drone strikes—a piece that expresses with an admirable economy of words nearly every conceptual error one can make on the subject. Let’s dissect. The problems begin right at the top, where Robinson begins by conceding that “U.S. drone attacks in Afghanistan, Pakistan . . .
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Extraordinary U.S. Press Freedom to Report Classified Information

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Monday, December 2, 2013 at 8:05 AM

The Washington Post reported last week that the United States government had decided not to prosecute Julian Assange for his role in the massive release of classified State Department cables because “government lawyers said they could not do so without also prosecuting U.S. news organizations and journalists.”  For reasons I outlined almost three years ago, I think this is the . . .
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Should U.S. Law Protect the Privacy of Foreigners Abroad?

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Friday, November 1, 2013 at 12:04 AM

United States privacy law traditionally has only protected the privacy of those in the United States and U.S. citizens abroad. Over at Just Security, David Cole argues that this should change. Privacy is a human right, he argues, and U.S. law should protect the privacy of foreigners all around the world. David offers three pragmatic . . .
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What Does Cybersecurity Have To Do With Health Care?

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Wednesday, October 30, 2013 at 10:02 PM

Not much, of course.  But according to this report in the Washington Post, Secretary Sebelius today responded to reports of a cybersecurity breach that was discovered recently.  According to Sebelius “there was not a breach” but a “theoretical problem” raised by a “skilled hacker.” She said the problem “was immediately fixed.”   Translated that means . . .
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New Reports on Drone Strike Casualties in Pakistan and Yemen

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Tuesday, October 22, 2013 at 3:24 PM

Two human rights groups released reports today on civilian casualties from selected drone strikes in Pakistan and Yemen. Amnesty International’s “Will I Be Next?” US Drone Strikes in Pakistan investigates nine drone strikes in North Waziristan between January 2012 and August 2013. Human Rights Watch’s “Between a Drone and Al Qaeda” The Civilian Cost of US Targeted Killings in . . .
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Conor Friedersdorf Peeks at My Ideology

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Monday, October 21, 2013 at 10:25 PM

Over at the Atlantic, Conor Friedersdorf takes a peek at my ideology in response to my critique of the Washington Post’s recent story on NSA collection of email contact lists overseas. I’m glad he did. Without this story, I might not know what I believe: Wittes isn’t just saying that the benefits of revealing this information are . . .
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Blowing Secrets for the Sake of Doing So?

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Tuesday, October 15, 2013 at 8:45 AM

The Washington Post this morning has the latest Snowden-leaked document story: “The National Security Agency is harvesting hundreds of millions of contact lists from personal e-mail and instant messaging accounts around the world, many of them belonging to Americans, according to senior intelligence officials and top-secret documents provided by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.” The story has a lot of . . .
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Adm. Bill McRaven on Navy SEALs

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Monday, October 7, 2013 at 4:00 PM

Courtesy of my office mate, Ross Tilchin, comes this Washington Post piece about a letter Adm. Bill McRaven, head of the U.S. Special Operations Command, wrote to one Walker Greentree, a 6-year old boy who wanted more information about the elite members of our armed forces. McRaven had some important advice for him—and even answered . . .
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WaPo Editorial Board Cites Lawfare

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Thursday, October 3, 2013 at 10:35 PM

Yesterday’s Washington Post editorial discussed the pernicious effects of the shutdown on U.S. national security, and quoted John’s post from last Sunday in it. The editorial opens: IF HOUSE Republicans have had an obsession to rival their hatred of the Affordable Care Act, it has been their determination to find a scandal in the 2012 attack on . . .
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My Statement Today Before the Senate Intelligence Committee

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Thursday, September 26, 2013 at 2:00 PM

The following is my my prepared statement for today’s hearing of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. The hearing, which is beginning at this hour, concerns reform of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.  Thank you, Chairman Feinstein, Vice Chairman Chambliss, and members of the committee for inviting me to present my views on reform of the Foreign . . .
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A Critique of the Latest Snowden Disclosures

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Thursday, August 29, 2013 at 5:04 PM

The world now has extraordinary access to the details of how the United States operates and funds its intelligence agencies, courtesy of Edward Showden and the Washington Post.  This will lead to no good.  It makes friendly countries nervous about what we can do, and unfriendly countries happy about what we can’t do.  This kind . . .
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This Has To Hurt — The IC Budget Revealed

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Thursday, August 29, 2013 at 3:08 PM

For years, the Intelligence Community has fought hard against the disclosure of its budget.  Even the top line total was, for many decades, classified.  Now, thanks to Edward Snowden, the Washington Post has the 2013 budget proposal.  [Warning to readers with clearances -- the article is not classified, but links therein appear to be.] As . . .
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The UK Legal Position on Humanitarian Intervention in Syria: Kosovo Redux

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Thursday, August 29, 2013 at 10:49 AM

I agree with Jack’s analysis of the UK statement. I would add that the British legal position is not new.   The British relied on the doctrine of humanitarian intervention for their participation in the NATO bombings of Kosovo in 1999 (when the Clinton Administration asserted no legal basis) and to police the No Fly Zones . . .
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The NSA, the Washington Post, and the Administration

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Sunday, August 18, 2013 at 12:00 PM

I cannot decide if I am more annoyed at the Washington Post or more annoyed at the Obama administration for the way this latest cache of Snowden-leaked NSA documents is playing. I have now gone through the documents with some care, and I find both the Post’s formulation of the story and the administration’s response to the . . .
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