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Tag Archives: Wall Street Journal

The Politics of War Powers in Iraq

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Wednesday, August 20, 2014 at 7:39 AM

The WSJ reports that the initial success of American airstrikes in Iraq is spurring a push for broader military engagement against the Islamic State (IS, or ISIS, or ISIL) in Iraq.  Our deepening military involvement in Iraq accentuates the dysfunctional politics of war powers that Julie Hirschfeld Davis writes about in the NYT.  President Obama . . .
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U.S. Air Strikes in Iraq Begin

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Friday, August 8, 2014 at 9:44 AM

The Pentagon tweets that the U.S. military has begun airstrikes against Islamic State (IS) positions in Iraq.  Precisely, force has been deployed against IS artillery that was used “against Kurdish forces defending Erbil, near US personnel.”  I have not yet seen a clear explanation of the domestic legal basis for the strikes, but the mention . . .
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Judge John Bates for the AO on Leahy Surveillance Bill

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Wednesday, August 6, 2014 at 8:47 PM

Over at the Wall Street Journal, Siobhan Gorman is reporting on a new letter from the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts on Sen. Leahy’s FISA reform legislation. Signed by U.S. District Judge John Bates, the AO’s director and former presiding judge of the FISA Court, the letter pulls few punches on the the public advocate provisions . . .
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Time To Terminate the Iran-US Claims Tribunal

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Monday, January 27, 2014 at 1:56 PM

I have an op-ed in today’s Wall Street Journal entitled “This Other Deal With Iran Is Obsolete” in which I argue that the current discussions between the US and Iran to reach a permanent agreement regarding Iran’s nuclear program provide a good opportunity to review the Algiers Accords, which were signed 33 years ago this month, . . .
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Is the AUMF Next?

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Friday, January 17, 2014 at 7:34 AM

Hmmmm. Here’s a very interesting few paragraphs from the Wall Street Journal: The president’s speech, to be delivered at the Justice Department, caps a process that was similar to the one he undertook on other controversial, post-Sept. 11 issues, such as the use of armed drones and closing the detention center in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. . . .
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Killer Robots and the Laws of War in Monday’s Wall Street Journal

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Monday, November 4, 2013 at 8:54 AM

Today’s Wall Street Journal carries an op-ed piece by Matt and me on the regulation of autonomous weapon systems, “Killer Robots and the Laws of War: Autonomous Weapons Are Coming and Can Save Lives. Let’s Make Sure They’re Used Ethically and Legally.”  Although the topic has not been especially visible in the United States (at . . .
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New Reports on Drone Strike Casualties in Pakistan and Yemen

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Tuesday, October 22, 2013 at 3:24 PM

Two human rights groups released reports today on civilian casualties from selected drone strikes in Pakistan and Yemen. Amnesty International’s “Will I Be Next?” US Drone Strikes in Pakistan investigates nine drone strikes in North Waziristan between January 2012 and August 2013. Human Rights Watch’s “Between a Drone and Al Qaeda” The Civilian Cost of US Targeted Killings in . . .
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“Drones Are the Future for Dull or Dangerous Missions”

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Wednesday, October 9, 2013 at 7:00 PM

The splendidly quotable title quote – “Clearly, drones are the future for dull or dangerous missions” – comes from Dan Jangblad , chief strategy officer for Sweden’s aerospace company, Saab AB, by way of an article in today’s Wall Street Journal (David Pearson, October 9, 2013, B6, likely behind paywall), “Europe’s  Elusive Drone Push.”  The article . . .
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Statement from the NSA and ODNI on WSJ Story

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Thursday, August 22, 2013 at 3:42 PM

In response to yesterday’s story in the Wall Street Journal on surveillance of internet communications, the NSA issued this statement:    

Blaming (or Crediting) the Lawyers for Our Syria Policy

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Monday, July 15, 2013 at 10:38 AM

This morning both the WSJ (behind paywall) and NYT have stories on how law and lawyers have influenced the changing USG posture on intervening in Syria.  The gist of the WSJ story is that administration lawyers, apparently relying on the ICJ Nicaragua Case, pushed back against policy makers who called for “more assertive U.S. action . . .
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Court Prohibits Government Hack Back

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Wednesday, April 24, 2013 at 5:05 PM

This report from today’s Wall Street Journal is fascinating.  It involves the decision of a Magistrate Judge to deny a government application for a search warrant in which the government proposed to install surreptitious software on the target computer (putatively owned and operated by the criminal suspect).  Among many interesting twists to the case, the . . .
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The AUMF Will Soon Extend to Syria (If It Doesn’t Already)

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Saturday, March 23, 2013 at 10:15 AM

The WSJ has a story (behind paywall, I think) about the CIA “expanding its role in the campaign against the Syrian regime by feeding intelligence to select rebel fighters to use against government forces.”  The point of the CIA aid is to “stem the rise of Islamist extremists in Syria by aiding secular forces,” and . . .
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More on Drone Shift from CIA to DOD

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Thursday, March 21, 2013 at 7:56 PM

Following up on Wells’ post, I increasingly think that the shift in drone authorities from CIA to DOD  first reported by Dan Klaidman might not amount to much in substance, and that any proposed changes face many hurdles in any event.  In addition to the suggestions to this effect in the  NYT story that Wells discusses, the . . .
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Breaking: U.S. Captures Osama bin Laden’s Son-in-Law in Jordan

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Thursday, March 7, 2013 at 11:53 AM

So reports the Wall Street Journal: A son-in-law of Osama bin Laden and longtime suspected member of al Qaeda has been captured by U.S. officials, who are preparing to bring him to the U.S. to face charges, according to three people familiar with the matter. Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, identified by counterterrorism officials as a spokesman . . .
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John Yoo on Targeted Killing White Paper

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Friday, February 8, 2013 at 6:42 AM

John Yoo has a piece in the WSJ which argues that the real problem with the White Paper is that it extends due process protections to enemy combatants on the battlefield, thereby threatening to diminish due process at home: The real story revealed by the memo is that the Obama administration is trying to dilute . . .
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The US Government Position on Imminence and Active Self-Defense

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Thursday, February 7, 2013 at 12:26 PM

(Updated and extended.)  The White Paper’s reference to imminence has occasioned some heated rhetoric about the Obama administration stretching the notion beyond all possible ordinary meaning or bounds, etc.  But it’s worth bearing in mind that there’s nothing new in this from the standpoint of the US government.  The US government has held this view . . .
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Denial of Territory to Terrorist/Insurgent Groups in Counterterrorism Strategy

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Sunday, January 27, 2013 at 4:57 PM

Jack and Ben have already flagged their entries in a Hoover Institution Task Force on National Security and Law series on national security challenges for the second Obama term (Hoover is adding one essay per day, all very short opinion piece of 1200 words of so).  My contribution points out that US “counterterrorism-on-offense,” as I’ve sometimes . . .
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No USG Appeal in Hamdan; Stay Tuned for al-Bahlul

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Friday, January 18, 2013 at 11:22 PM

We end the evening with this procedural nugget from Jess Bravin of the Wall Street Journal: in Hamdan II, the deadline for the United States to seek en banc review from the D.C. Circuit, or a writ of certiorari from the Supreme Court, came and went.  The last day for further court challenge in that case, by . . .
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The Logic of Cyber-Regulation Seen in Iranian Cyber-Attacks on U.S. Banks

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Wednesday, January 16, 2013 at 6:31 AM

The WSJ reports that U.S. banks “are pressing for government action to block or squelch what Washington officials say is an intensifying Iranian campaign of cyberattacks against American financial institutions.”  The banks are asking the USG to use diplomatic pressure, block the attacks, or take down the computers launching them.  The WSJ adds: “The outcry . . .
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Readings: David Skeel on Religion and the US Military

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Sunday, December 30, 2012 at 3:20 PM

University of Pennsylvania law professor David Skeel has an important opinion piece in the December 28, 2012 Wall Street Journal on the role of religion in the US military, “The Military Balance of Faith and Freedom: A West Point cadet resigns over religiosity at the Academy, but other cadets have rights, too.” (For those of . . .
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