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Tag Archives: Robert Gates

No More Drones For CIA

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Wednesday, March 20, 2013 at 5:45 AM

That is the title of Dan Klaidman’s important story: Three senior U.S. officials tell The Daily Beast that the White House is poised to sign off on a plan to shift the CIA’s lethal targeting program to the Defense Department. . . .The proposed plan would unify the command and control structure of targeted killings, . . .
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Jeh Johnson Speech on “A ‘Drone Court': Some Pros and Cons”

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Monday, March 18, 2013 at 9:30 AM

Former Pentagon General Counsel Jeh Johnson is, at this hour, giving this speech at Fordham Law School in New York: Keynote address at the Center on National Security at Fordham Law School:  A “Drone Court”: Some Pros and Cons by Jeh Charles Johnson[1] March 18, 2013 [preliminary extemporaneous remarks] Thank you for this invitation.  Today I . . .
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More on Drones versus Enhanced Interrogation

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Saturday, February 16, 2013 at 3:25 PM

Further to Jack’s post yesterday on the politics of drones versus enhanced interrogation, and my post earlier in the week about Peter Baker’s article about the mounting criticism of the Obama Administration’s counter-terror policies, comes this article by Sara Sorcher in the National Journal, provocatively entitled “Is Obama’s Drone Policy Really Morally Superior to Torture? Bush . . .
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Robert Gates on Drones (and the Politics of Drones v. Enhanced Interrogation)

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Friday, February 15, 2013 at 9:37 AM

Via this thoughtful essay by Pejman Yousefzadeh, I learned about this CNN interview (video below) with former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, in which he notes his support for drone strikes but suggests ways to enhance accountability of Executive branch decisions to engage in targeted killing of an American citizen.

Why a “Drone Court” Won’t Work–But (Nominal) Damages Might…

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Sunday, February 10, 2013 at 5:12 PM

There’s been a fair amount of buzz over the past few days centered around the idea of a statutory “drone court”–a tribunal modeled after the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC) that would (presumably) provide at least some modicum of due process before the government engages in targeted killing operations, but that, like the FISC, would . . .
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Hoover Task Force Short Essays #5, #6, and #7

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Thursday, January 31, 2013 at 7:37 AM

I’ve fallen behind in linking to the short essays being published by the Hoover Institution Task Force on National Security and Law. The latest come from Tod Lindberg, Amy Zegart, and Philip Bobbitt. Lindberg’s essay, entitled “Libya, Syria, and the Responsibility to Protect” opens as follows: At the 2005 United Nations World Summit, member states . . .
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Civil Suit By Ex-Gitmo Detainee Dismissed

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Saturday, December 24, 2011 at 5:58 PM

On Thursday, Judge Richard Leon of the U.S. District Court in D.C. issued a little-noticed decision granting dismissal in Al Janko v. Gates. The case is noteworthy, however, because Al Janko–unlike other former detainees who have filed civil suits–“is the first detainee who was released pursuant to a successful habeas petition to seek damages for acts . . .
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The Pandora’s Box Critique of Drones, and Other Concerns

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Friday, October 28, 2011 at 10:48 AM

Yesterday Harper’s ran a piece by Daniel Swift on drones, criticizing the extensive but selective leaking of details about the CIA drone program.  It’s a fair point, resonating with Ken Anderson’s concerns regarding the legitimacy issues that arise with deniable-but-not-truly-covert activity.   I have problems with several of Swift’s other arguments, however. First, the article points . . .
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Are We Nearing an End of Hostilities?

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Monday, July 11, 2011 at 7:59 AM

When the Secretary of Defense declares, as Leon Panetta recently did, that the strategic defeat of Al Qaeda is “within reach,” it is probably time to start thinking about the termination of hostilities for purposes of AUMF detention authority. The Washington Post reports that: Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta, who arrived in Kabul on Saturday, said . . .
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ROLFF-A Gets a Boost from NATO

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Thursday, June 9, 2011 at 9:46 AM

Defense Ministers from the 48 nations of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) today endorsed the NATO Rule of Law Field Support Mission (NROLFSM).  The press release describes the mission as follows: Governance and service delivery in Afghanistan remain key to ensure security gains are sustainable. Difficult terrain and insecurity pose challenges to lawyers, judges . . .
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Drones in Libya

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Thursday, April 21, 2011 at 4:44 PM

The Associated Press is reporting that U.S. forces are using armed Predator drones in Libya: President Barack Obama has approved the use of armed Predator drone aircraft in Libya to improve the precision of low-level attacks on ground targets, Defense Secretary Robert Gates said Thursday. The first Predator mission since Obama’s go-ahead was flown Thursday . . .
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Secretary Gates on Rule of Law in Afghanistan and the Possible Expansion of ROLFF

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Friday, March 11, 2011 at 4:29 PM

In a speech today that criticized NATO coalition partners for their diminishing contributions to the Afghanistan effort, Secretary of Defense Gates said something remarkable about the rule of law in the context of the Afghanistan transition: [A]s we consider the elements of effective transition, it is worth recalling the core grievances in Afghanistan that spawned . . .
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Detention Policy: The Executive Branch is a “They,” Not an “It”

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Thursday, February 17, 2011 at 2:39 PM

As Bobby mentioned, I’m giving a keynote address at noon tomorrow at American University’s Washington College of Law on the question, “The Guantanamo Detainees, What Next?”  In that speech I will try, among other things, to assess the significance of these five statements from senior Obama administration officials in the last two days: CIA Director . . .
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McCarthy on Charlie Savage

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Monday, January 24, 2011 at 8:27 AM

As Lawfare readers know, I am not above criticizing the New York Times–or its estimable national security correspondent, Charlie Savage. I recently accused the Times’ editorial board of lying about the law, for example, and I have also recently lamented the role that Savage’s early reporting (for the Boston Globe, actually) on signing statements played in distilling . . .
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Moving Forward on Commissions

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Thursday, January 20, 2011 at 10:35 AM

[updated to clarify that there are new regs in the works, not a new manual] Charlie Savage reports this morning that Secretary Gates may soon lift an order that has precluded the initiation of new military commision proceedings since 2009.  Individuals such as Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri (described in the 9/11 Commission Report as AQ’s key . . .
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Realism 101 on Wikileaks

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Wednesday, December 1, 2010 at 4:29 AM

Secretary of Defense Gates on the significance of the latest wikileaks disclosures (via SWJ): But let me – let me just offer some perspective as somebody who’s been at this a long time. Every other government in the world knows the United States government leaks like a sieve, and it has for a long time. . . .
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More from the Government’s Al Aulaqi Filing

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Saturday, September 25, 2010 at 11:57 PM

Jack has already posted the government’s brief in opposition to the ACLU’s and CCR’s request for a preliminary injunction and in support of its motion to dismiss. The government, however, filed some other interesting documents along with this lengthy brief. On the mundane end, there is the government’s motion to dismiss itself. More interesting are the . . .
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