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Tag Archives: National Security Agency (NSA)

A Modest Proposal for NSA

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Tuesday, March 18, 2014 at 11:29 AM

I had an idea the other day—a way for NSA to serve the national interest, do good for humanity, and improve its public image all at once. Drum roll, please! NSA should get into the business of publishing trade secrets stolen from companies in countries that conduct active industrial espionage against U.S. companies. Before you . . .
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NSA Responds to ABA Letter on Attorney-Client Privilege

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Monday, March 10, 2014 at 10:10 PM

Last month, the American Bar Association wrote to General Keith Alexander to express concern over press reports that overseas snooping by U.S. allies had intercepted communications by U.S. lawyers and their clients—and that NSA had played a role. Now, General Alexander has responded. Here’s the letter.  

The Debate About the NSA Is Over

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Monday, March 3, 2014 at 11:17 AM

Well, not really.  But you know that a trend is going against the NSA when the American Bar Association offers a course entitled, “The Ethical Implications of NSA Surveillance.”  According to the the ABA: Our panel will take you through the revelations about NSA to date and outline the steps law firms can (and ethically must) take . . .
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The Problem at the Heart of the NSA Disputes: Legal Density

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Wednesday, February 5, 2014 at 9:14 AM

An old friend of mine, a mathematician at an elite college, told me some time back that—while still a student—he or she had done some work for NSA and been greatly relieved by the strict assurance given in the personnel orientation that the agency does not spy on Americans. Starting with the revelations in 2005 . . .
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NSA Privacy Officer Selected

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Tuesday, January 28, 2014 at 8:00 AM

Late last year, as one of the fall outs from the Snowden disclosures, the NSA announced its intention to fill a completely new office — a civil liberties and privacy officer who would serve as a direct adviser to the Director of NSA.  Civil libertarians are skeptical and I think it is fair to say . . .
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Text of the President’s Remarks on NSA and Surveillance

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Friday, January 17, 2014 at 11:23 AM

Below is the full text of President Obama’s speech: Remarks of President Barack Obama Results of our Signals Intelligence Review January 17, 2014 Washington, D.C.   As Prepared for Delivery – At the dawn of our Republic, a small, secret surveillance committee borne out of the “The Sons of Liberty” was established in Boston. The . . .
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LIVE: President Obama Speaks on the NSA

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Friday, January 17, 2014 at 10:55 AM

JOIN THE LIVE CHAT VISIT WHITEHOUSE.GOV

Two Thoughts on the Sanger/Shanker Story on NSA Infiltration of Foreign Networks

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Wednesday, January 15, 2014 at 6:56 AM

David Sanger and Thom Shanker have a lengthy story in the NYT about various NSA techniques for penetrating foreign computers and networks, including a strategy for accessing seemingly air-gapped computers.  Two thoughts: First, this article shows how much publication norms have changed in recent years.  (Sanger and Shanker note that the NYT did not publish . . .
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“Overblown” and “Misleading”? The New America Foundation Report on the Role of NSA Surveillance in Preventing Attacks

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Monday, January 13, 2014 at 9:37 PM

Since Edward Snowden unveiled the existence of NSA’s mass surveillance programs in June, various government officials have gone on the record to claim that the programs have prevented terrorist attacks and saved lives. Today the New America Foundation (NAF) released a report that purports to offer evidence that these claims are “overblown and even misleading.” . . .
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A Modest Proposal for NSA Data Collection

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Thursday, January 9, 2014 at 10:04 PM

I have a suggestion for solving nearly all of NSA’s problems: A click-through agreement. A peculiarity of the NSA data collection controversy is that the US public, we are told, is outraged by NSA activities, including the collection of “metadata,” on the one hand, while that same public appears quite willing to share much of . . .
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Morosov on the Significance of Snowden

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Friday, December 27, 2013 at 7:43 AM

Evgeny Morosov has an interesting piece in the FT that asks about the broader and mostly ignored implications of Snowden’s revelations about the scope of NSA surveillance.  He argues that controlling the NSA and raising government privacy protections does not begin to get at the root of what he sees as the essential problem of . . .
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Cole and Lederman, and Morell, on Review Group Report

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Monday, December 23, 2013 at 4:39 PM

Marty Lederman has a good summary of the highlights of the President’s Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technologies at Just Security.  And he and David Cole have a lengthy post on what they say is a neglected issue in coverage of the Report: The issue of the proper use by the government of meta-data, as opposed . . .
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40,000 Foot Reactions to President’s Review Group Report and Recommendations

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Friday, December 20, 2013 at 10:25 AM

Pre-Snowden, the USG faced few constraints in its collection and analysis other than what the law imposed and what its large budget permitted.  Within these constraints, the USG could focus almost solely on the national security benefit side of communications surveillance, for there were few costs to it.  However, after Snowden’s revelation of the NSA’s . . .
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(Very) Quick Reactions to Proposed NSA Reforms

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Friday, December 13, 2013 at 10:31 AM

It is precarious to comment on a leaked version of broad conclusions from a government report.  But I think the NYT and WSJ accounts of the recommendations by the President’s Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technology – which consists of Richard A. Clarke, Michael Morell, Cass Sunstein, Geoffrey Stone, and Peter Swire – on . . .
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Extraordinary U.S. Press Freedom to Report Classified Information

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Monday, December 2, 2013 at 8:05 AM

The Washington Post reported last week that the United States government had decided not to prosecute Julian Assange for his role in the massive release of classified State Department cables because “government lawyers said they could not do so without also prosecuting U.S. news organizations and journalists.”  For reasons I outlined almost three years ago, I think this is the . . .
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Whose Fault is it if China and Iran Restrict Free Speech? NSA’s—Of Course

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Monday, November 18, 2013 at 3:23 PM

That, at least, seems to be what Ken Roth—executive director of Human Rights Watch—is arguing in this essay on the New York Review of Books web site. Entitled “The NSA’s Global Threat to Free Speech,” the piece is devoted to decrying not merely the implications for privacy of NSA spying but what Roth terms “the global threat . . .
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An Overview of FISA Reform Options on Capitol Hill

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Sunday, November 3, 2013 at 10:08 AM

Edward Snowden’s disclosures and subsequent government declassifications have prompted a wave of proposals to retool the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (“FISA”). Some of these proposed revisions are new; others merely reprise older ideas which were put forward earlier in Congress, as recently as 2012. Rare bipartisan alliances have coalesced during the debate—ones that have more . . .
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Indonesia and China Question Use of Embassies for Spying

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Friday, November 1, 2013 at 12:00 PM

Voice of America is reporting that the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta (like the U.S. Embassy in Berlin) was apparently used by the NSA for spying on President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono.  Indonesia is seeking an explanation from the United States.  It also appears that that Australia permitted covert NSA programs to operate in “its embassies in . . .
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Should U.S. Law Protect the Privacy of Foreigners Abroad?

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Friday, November 1, 2013 at 12:04 AM

United States privacy law traditionally has only protected the privacy of those in the United States and U.S. citizens abroad. Over at Just Security, David Cole argues that this should change. Privacy is a human right, he argues, and U.S. law should protect the privacy of foreigners all around the world. David offers three pragmatic . . .
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The Latest NSA Documents: A Summary

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Wednesday, October 30, 2013 at 3:00 PM

The latest cache of documents released by the DNI does not contain any explosive new revelations. Unlike previous releases, it does not show big problems under either Section 215 or Section 702 that produced FISC litigations over months to resolve. They are, to put it mildly, pretty weedy. That said, there is important information in . . .
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