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Tag Archives: National Security Agency (NSA)

Steptoe Cyberlaw Podcast, Episode #39: An Interview with Tom Finan

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Thursday, October 23, 2014 at 11:51 AM

Our guest today is Tom Finan, Senior Cybersecurity Strategist and Counsel at DHS’s National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD), where he is currently working on policy issues related to cybersecurity insurance and cybersecurity legislation.  Marc Frey asks him why DHS, specifically NPPD, is interested in cybersecurity insurance, what trends they are seeing in this space for . . .
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Steptoe Cyberlaw Podcast, Episode #38: An Interview with Shaun Waterman

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Thursday, October 16, 2014 at 4:30 PM

Our guest for the podcast is Shaun Waterman, editor of POLITICO Pro Cybersecurity. Shaun is an award-winning journalist who has worked for the BBC and United Press International; and an expert on counterterrorism and cybersecurity. We begin as usual with the week’s NSA news. NSA has released its second privacy transparency report. We’ve invited Becky Richards, NSA’s privacy and civil liberties . . .
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Steptoe Cyberlaw Podcast, Episode #36: An Interview with Admiral David Simpson

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Wednesday, October 1, 2014 at 2:30 PM

Our guest today is Admiral David Simpson, Chief of the FCC’s Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau.  Admiral Simpson has more than 20 years of Information and Communications Technology experience supporting the Department of Defense.  Adm. Simpson is joined by Clete Johnson, his Chief Counsel for Cybersecurity.  The interview digs deep into Chairman Wheeler’s cybersecurity . . .
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DOJ AND ODNI Support Leahy NSA Reform Bill

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Thursday, September 4, 2014 at 4:36 PM

It looks like it’s time for Lawfare to update an old post of ours, “Who is Saying What about the Leahy Surveillance Bill.” On September 2, Attorney General Eric Holder and Director of National Intelligence James Clapper sent a letter to Senator Patrick Leahy endorsing the Senator’s version of the USA FREEDOM Act.  Key passages are . . .
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Steptoe Cyberlaw Podcast, Episode #32: An Interview with David Hoffman

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Wednesday, September 3, 2014 at 3:38 PM

We’re back!  After a much needed hiatus, during which we shared wilderness paths with bison, woke up to wolf cries, and celebrated the value of ibuprofen, the Steptoe Cyberlaw Podcast is back on the net. The hiatus allows us to cover this month in NSA, which is a good thing, because the Snowden News Machine . . .
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NSA’s Anne Neuberger Speaks at Long Now Foundation

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Tuesday, September 2, 2014 at 3:43 PM

The National Security Agency’s Anne Neuberger, the director of the NSA’s Commercial Solutions Center, gave this seminar recently at the Long Now Foundation. Full video is available at the web site. Here’s the audio:

Senator Leahy’s NSA Reform Bill: A Quick and Dirty Summary

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Tuesday, July 29, 2014 at 7:21 PM

As Wells reported this morning, Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy unveiled his version of the NSA reform bill today. Leahy’s bill is important because, well, it’s not just Leahy’s bill. It’s the bill. It represents a compromise between the intelligence community, the administration more generally, civil liberties groups, industry, and fairly wide range of . . .
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Senators Express Concern on 702 Interpretation

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Sunday, July 27, 2014 at 3:43 PM

Ellen Nakashima at the Washington Post reports that four U.S. Senators—Jon Tester, Jeff Merkley, Mark Begich, and John Walsh—wrote a July 24th letter to DNI Clapper expressing their concerns with NSA’s interpretation of Section 702 of the FISA Amendments Act of 2008. They pull heavily from the PCLOB report released earlier this month, in which the Board observed that . . .
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What Exactly Was Edward Snowden’s Job?

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Wednesday, July 23, 2014 at 8:29 PM

The New York Times the other day ran this story about an interview Edward Snowden gave to the Guardian in Moscow. The Guardian interview made a few waves because of Snowden’s claim that NSA analysts passed around racy photos they had intercepted. I was struck by a different aspect of it. The New York Times characterized it as follows: . . .
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Civil Liberties Groups Write to White House, Express Concerns Over Intercept Story on NSA & FBI Surveillance

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Wednesday, July 9, 2014 at 2:31 PM

In response to today’s Intercept story on NSA and FBI surveillance of Muslim Americans, a large coalition of civil liberties and human rights groups have written to the White House—and, among other things, asked the Obama Administration for a “full and public accounting” of the surveillance described in the story.  Here is the letter (which I . . .
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On Glenn Greenwald’s Latest

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Wednesday, July 9, 2014 at 7:00 AM

After a huge amount of pre-publication hype, Glenn Greenwald’s new capstone NSA story is out, and I find myself with little to say about it. Greenwald has gotten his hands on a spreadsheet listing the email addresses of people supposedly subject to FISA surveillance, and he has identified five Muslim Americans whose addresses are on . . .
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Edward Snowden: Civil Liberties Violator

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Monday, July 7, 2014 at 11:56 PM

A government contractor steals tens of thousands of highly-sensitive communications intercepts. The communications have national security implications, yes, but put that aside for now. They also involve the most intimate details of the lives of thousands of people: their love letters, their pictures of their kids, their pictures of themselves in lingerie, records reflecting their . . .
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A Quick Read of the Post’s Latest NSA Story

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Sunday, July 6, 2014 at 11:14 AM

The Washington Post has a dramatic new NSA story today, one that is qualitatively different from any of the previous Edward Snowden revelations. Written by Barton Gellman, Julie Tate, and Ashkan Soltani, the story describes a large cache of intercepted communications (roughly 160,000 email and instant message exchanges) and the benefits and privacy costs of . . .
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Carrie Cordero’s Contribution to Cato Unbound Snowden Discussion

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Friday, June 13, 2014 at 11:36 AM

The other day, I linked to the first two contributions to Cato Unbound‘s forum, “The Snowden Files: One Year Later.” Now Carrie Cordero has added an essay, which opens: There is no doubt the Snowden disclosures have launched a debate that raises significant issues  regarding the extent of U.S. government national security surveillance authorities and activities. And Julian . . .
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Why Does the Omniscient Panopticon Tolerate Glenn Greenwald?

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Monday, June 9, 2014 at 7:11 AM

If you believe Glenn Greenwald’s new book (which I reviewed here), the NSA’s appetite for gobbling up communications is unlimited. Legal controls on its behavior are trivial. Its much-repeated claim that it does not spy on American citizens is a lie. And its goal in its collection activities is political control over citizens, whom surveillance renders . . .
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Is the NSA Story Coming to an End?

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Monday, May 5, 2014 at 7:28 AM

Stewart Baker began this week’s Steptoe Cyberlaw Podcast—which always opens with the week’s NSA news—by noting that there was virtually no NSA news this week. That which did exist, moreover, was not the result of new Snowden-related leaks but a declassification. It wasn’t the first time the pickings have been slim of late. The machine that was, . . .
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The Policy Tension on Zero-Days Will Not Go Away

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Monday, April 14, 2014 at 11:32 AM

The proposition that NSA should under no circumstances stockpile zero-day vulnerabilities, but should in all cases disclose them in order to perfect defenses, apparently has appeal in some quarters.  It is based on at least two false assumptions.  The first is that the number of zero-days is finite, or, if not finite, then at least . . .
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On The Recent FISC Preservation Rulings

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Thursday, April 10, 2014 at 5:00 PM

When last we checked in on the metadata preservation saga, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court had authorized the government—in contravention of its prior order—to retain metadata beyond the FISA-imposed five year limit in order to account for evidence preservation issues being litigated by civil plaintiffs in suits against the NSA in the Northern District of California.  On . . .
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A Modest Proposal for NSA

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Tuesday, March 18, 2014 at 11:29 AM

I had an idea the other day—a way for NSA to serve the national interest, do good for humanity, and improve its public image all at once. Drum roll, please! NSA should get into the business of publishing trade secrets stolen from companies in countries that conduct active industrial espionage against U.S. companies. Before you . . .
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NSA Responds to ABA Letter on Attorney-Client Privilege

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Monday, March 10, 2014 at 10:10 PM

Last month, the American Bar Association wrote to General Keith Alexander to express concern over press reports that overseas snooping by U.S. allies had intercepted communications by U.S. lawyers and their clients—and that NSA had played a role. Now, General Alexander has responded. Here’s the letter.