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Tag Archives: National Public Radio (NPR)

Dirty Wars: The World is a Battlefield

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Sunday, November 3, 2013 at 9:04 PM

Dirty Wars: The World is a Battlefield by Jeremy Scahill—the activist-turned journalist previously known for his exposé of the military contractor formerly known as Blackwater—is a bad book. But it’s a bad book with a significantly redeeming feature. Scahill’s project is to depict the “dark side” of what he considers to be America’s unrestrained pursuit of security . . .
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Support Lawfare Too—Or Instead

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Saturday, October 19, 2013 at 9:13 AM

This week was pledge drive on Washington’s major NPR affiliate: WAMU. If you’re like me, NPR pledge week involves a certain disruption in daily schedule. NPR is one of my major news sources. But I tend to go without it during pledge weeks on grounds that, well, listening to people harangue me for money is . . .
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The Case for Drones

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Wednesday, May 22, 2013 at 11:20 AM

With President Obama’s big speech tomorrow on counterterrorism policy at National Defense University in mind, Commentary Magazine has been nice enough to post today my June cover essay, “The Case for Drones.”  (It’s free; no subscriber wall.)  Lawfare readers will probably immediately understand it as a mixture of the arguments Ben and I made at . . .
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NPR on the Situation in Guantanamo

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Sunday, May 12, 2013 at 7:07 AM

National Public Radio has run this very interesting story on the situation at Guantanamo. It’s a lengthy segment, more than 11 minutes and features extended comments from former Attorney General Alberto Gonzales, Miami Herald reporter Carol Rosenberg, and former military commission prosecutor Lt. Col. Stuart Couch. Worth a listen. UPDATE: Speaking of NPR shows on . . .
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Greg McNeal Talks Drone Courts on NPR

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Sunday, March 31, 2013 at 11:29 AM

From Weekend Edition, a very thoughtful and useful discussion with Greg McNeal on some of themes of his recent guest blogging on Lawfare:

Thoughtful Essay on Drones, Privacy and Domestic Regulation . . .

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Wednesday, March 13, 2013 at 6:41 AM

. . . by Ryan Calo over at Concurring Opinions: For many, the word “drone” brings to mind an image of the military-grade Predator. The folks within the DYI Drones movement, however, and most local law enforcement, are more likely to be building or using a quadrocopter.  These devices are light, generally battery-powered, and capable of somewhere . . .
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More on Asymmetries Between USG Response to Cyber Exploitation and Cyber Attack

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Monday, February 11, 2013 at 2:31 PM

I have been beating this one the death, and will not for a while after this, but the gap between the supposed threat of cyberespionage and our response to it continues to amaze.  From Ellen Nakashima, we learn this morning that a “new intelligence assessment has concluded that the United States is the target of . . .
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Radio Thoughts on Drones and White Papers

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Saturday, February 9, 2013 at 5:55 PM

NPR’s Weekend Edition ran the following extended interview with me this morning on the subject of drone strikes, the White Paper, and the administration’s legal views more generally. It isn’t anything new to Lawfare readers, but Scott Simon and the NPR team did a nice job of distilling a lengthier discussion into a good, clear . . .
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A Note on Dan Fried

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Tuesday, January 29, 2013 at 10:09 PM

On All Things Considered this evening, NPR’s Ari Shapiro ran this story on the closing of Amb. Daniel Fried’s Guantanamo resettlement office at State: The story follows this Charlie Savage piece in the New York Times, which Matt flagged yesterday. Ari quotes me in the story saying some nice things about Fried’s work over the last four . . .
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How the Rules Changed on Women in Combat—A Legislative and Executive History Primer

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Saturday, January 26, 2013 at 9:17 AM

To considerable fanfare, departing Defense Secretary Leon Panetta and Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey announced this week the decision to lift the ban on woman serving in combat units. Panetta stated: “General Dempsey and I are pleased to announce that we are eliminating the Direct Ground Combat Exclusion rule for women and we are moving . . .
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Diane Rehm Show Episode on Gaza Conflict

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Tuesday, November 20, 2012 at 2:28 PM

NPR and WAMU’s Diane Rehm Show yesterday had a remarkably sophisticated and serious hour on the Gaza conflict. Well worth a listen for anyone who’s interested in the ongoing unpleasantness there. Guests included: Michael Oren—Israeli ambassador to the U.S.   Aaron David Miller—vice president and distinguished scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center, and former . . .
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Hearing Today in Al Maqaleh v. Rumsfeld

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Monday, July 16, 2012 at 9:10 AM

As Ben noted last month, Judge Bates recently has shown some interest in possibly moving the Boumediene-at-Bagram case, Al Maqaleh v. Rumsfeld, along toward a resolution.  After several very quiet months seemingly mulling over the pleadings before him, on the same day NPR aired a story suggesting that the U.S. “may have created a Guantanamo-style . . .
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Has Judge John Bates Been Listening to NPR?

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Monday, June 4, 2012 at 9:00 PM

This morning, National Public Radio ran this story, which Wells linked to earlier, noting that the concern that the United States was recreating Guantanamo at Bagram: Today, U.S. District Judge John Bates issued the following curious order in both of the long-dormant litigations seeking to extend Boumediene habeas jursdiction to Bagram–the Maqaleh and Hamidullah cases: . . .
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GTMO Detainees “Have No Legal Recourse to Contest Their Detention”?

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Wednesday, January 11, 2012 at 10:09 AM

Never fear, Ben!  While the Times may have disappointed you today, NPR has stepped into the breach this morning with its Guantanamo anniversary story. To be frank, I’m more than a little surprised by this, as NPR’s coverage is usually top-notch.  The relevant passage follows a clip from an interview with Mark Martins in which Mark argues that upcoming . . .
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John Brennan on NDAA Veto Threat

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Saturday, December 10, 2011 at 9:42 AM

President Obama’s chief counterterrorism adviser, John Brennan, has given an extended interview to NPR on the administration’s view of the NDAA’s detainee affairs provision and its threat to veto the legislation. Not a lot new in the interview, but it does seem to me significant that the administration is reiterating the veto threat at this . . .
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The Mehanna Prosecution and the First Amendment

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Wednesday, October 26, 2011 at 5:28 PM

An important case gets underway tomorrow in Boston: the civilian criminal prosecution of Tarek Mehanna, charged with an array of offenses stemming from allegations that he traveled to Yemen in 2004 in an effort to get training so he could go on to fight against U.S. forces in Iraq, and that he subsequently became involved . . .
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Abdulmutallab Pleads Guilty to All Counts

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Wednesday, October 12, 2011 at 11:08 AM

So reports NPR here.

French Parliament Endorses Continued Operations in Libya

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Tuesday, July 12, 2011 at 5:51 PM

This afternoon, NPR and France 24 reported on two significant events regarding Libya.  First, Gadhafi may be ready to leave the country, and his representatives have sought negotiations regarding the mechanics of a potential departure. Readers who have followed recent congressional activity related to Libya and the War Powers Resolution (“WPR”) will also be interested . . .
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Additional Details on the CIA-Interrogation Investigations

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Thursday, June 30, 2011 at 5:13 PM

Carrie Johnson at NPR posts (who knew that NPR reporters were blogging?  This is really great stuff – add Carrie to your RSS feed) some important additional details.  First, she confirms that there is still an open thread in the tape-destruction component of Durham’s investigation: specifically, possible false statement charges involving one person.  Second, she . . .
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Moot

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Friday, June 17, 2011 at 4:52 PM

The Washington Post and NPR report that the 13-year old case against Osama bin Laden has been dismissed. The Post says that: The government filing lists bin Laden’s alleged crimes, and then states: “On or about May 1, 2011, while this case was still pending, defendant Usama bin Laden was killed in Abbottabad, Pakistan, in . . .
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