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Tag Archives: New York Times (NYT)

The NYT on NSA’s Huawei Penetration [UPDATED]

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Saturday, March 22, 2014 at 8:41 PM

David Sanger and Nicole Perlroth report about how the NSA has successfully placed backdoors into the networks of the Chinese Telecommunications giant Huawei for purposes of (a) discerning Huawei’s links to the People’s Liberation Army and (b) preparing for offensive operations in third countries.   It also has some detail (apparently based on leaks other than . . .
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What is the Point of the New Drone Targeting Rules?

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Friday, February 28, 2014 at 8:33 AM

Another tidbit from the NYT story Ben just flagged: It is unclear what Mr. Obama’s position is on whether Mr. Shami should be targeted.  American officials said that as part of the new rules ordered by Mr. Obama, the Pentagon, rather than the C.I.A., is supposed to carry out any lethal strike against an American . . .
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Who is the American the U.S. May Be Targeting Overseas?

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Friday, February 28, 2014 at 7:31 AM

The New York Times has the answer—sort of: WASHINGTON — He is known as Abdullah al-Shami, an Arabic name meaning Abdullah the Syrian. But his nom de guerre masks a reality: He was born in the United States, and the United States is now deciding whether to kill him. Mr. Shami, a militant who American . . .
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A Partial Answer to My Question

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Tuesday, February 25, 2014 at 9:44 PM

The estimable Benjamin Weiser of the excellent New York Times news staff wrote me this afternoon response to my post earlier today about the government’s motion for pseudononymous testimony in the Sulaiman Abu Gayth case. I had reported that: Judge Kaplan, in a handwritten notation, appears to have rejected the motion two days later. He writes: “Motion . . .
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A Question for the New York Times

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Monday, February 24, 2014 at 12:45 PM

The New York Times has an editorial today about the need for data privacy legislation and about the report that president adviser John Podesta is putting together on big data and privacy. “The president and the public need from Mr. Podesta and his team not only a thorough description of how businesses are collecting private data but . . .
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What I Am—And What I Am Not—Saying About Laura Poitras

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Sunday, February 16, 2014 at 8:46 PM

This morning, Jane and I posted a critique of the New York Times‘s very silly story about non-NSA surveillance—by one foreign government against another foreign governments—surveillance not against US persons, surveillance which did not target lawyers. The story was headlined: “Spying by N.S.A. Ally Entangled U.S. Law Firm.” The story’s dual byline included Laura Poitras, a documentary . . .
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The Latest Snowden Leak: NSA Isn’t Spying on Lawyers

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Sunday, February 16, 2014 at 9:11 AM

Unless the public is really tiring of matters Snowden, the New York Times’s latest is going to stir up the hornet’s nest. “Spying by N.S.A. Ally Entangled U.S. Law Firm,” blares the headline of the story by reporter James Risen and freelancer Laura Poitras—from whom the Times (which insists it never pays for information) sometimes . . .
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Looks Like I’m Not Alone in My View of the New York Times Editorial Page

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Wednesday, February 12, 2014 at 4:31 PM

According to the New York Observer, anyway, the news staff seems to agree with me: IT’S WELL KNOWN AMONG THE SMALL WORLD of people who pay attention to such things that the liberal-leaning reporters at The Wall Street Journal resent the conservative-leaning editorial page of The Wall Street Journal. What’s less well known—and about to break into the open, threatening the very . . .
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Two Thoughts on the Sanger/Shanker Story on NSA Infiltration of Foreign Networks

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Wednesday, January 15, 2014 at 6:56 AM

David Sanger and Thom Shanker have a lengthy story in the NYT about various NSA techniques for penetrating foreign computers and networks, including a strategy for accessing seemingly air-gapped computers.  Two thoughts: First, this article shows how much publication norms have changed in recent years.  (Sanger and Shanker note that the NYT did not publish . . .
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Describing Bob Litt in Contradictory Terms?

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Tuesday, January 14, 2014 at 8:04 AM

In his profile yesterday of DNI General Counsel Bob Litt, the Washington Post‘s Greg Miller writes: Litt has donated tens of thousands of dollars to Democratic candidates and causes, and friends describe him in somewhat contradictory terms: an avowed liberal on social issues but a true believer in the propriety of surveillance programs such as those . . .
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From IC On The Record: A response to the Times Editorial, and the FISC Renews the Telephony Metadata Program

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Monday, January 6, 2014 at 2:18 PM

Two important releases showed up on the Office of the Director of National Intelligence’s Tumblr on Friday. First, the General Counsel for the ODNI, Bob Litt, responded to the New York Times Edward Snowden editorial last week, and sought to set the record straight with regard to the DNI’s exchange with Senator Ron Wyden’s staff in . . .
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Linda Greenhouse on “The Mirror of Guantanamo”

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Thursday, December 12, 2013 at 7:26 AM

Linda Greenhouse has a thoughtful column over at the New York Times entitled “The Mirror of Guantanamo” about the Abdul Razak Ali case—about which I wrote some thoughts last week. Ten years ago, Greenhouse notes, the courts first delved into the Guantanamo issue: It was on Nov. 10, 2003, that the Supreme Court surprised much of . . .
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Extraordinary U.S. Press Freedom to Report Classified Information

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Monday, December 2, 2013 at 8:05 AM

The Washington Post reported last week that the United States government had decided not to prosecute Julian Assange for his role in the massive release of classified State Department cables because “government lawyers said they could not do so without also prosecuting U.S. news organizations and journalists.”  For reasons I outlined almost three years ago, I think this is the . . .
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Hunger-Striker Hassan Files Motion to Intervene in Aamer v. Obama

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Monday, November 4, 2013 at 6:00 PM

As promised by petitioners in their filing last week, and in response to the government’s letter to the court suggesting that their case is moot: Guantanamo detainee Imad Abdullah Hassan today moved to intervene in Aamer v. Obama, the force feeding case on appeal in the D.C. Circuit. Unlike the three original petitioners, Hassan is still . . .
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Should U.S. Law Protect the Privacy of Foreigners Abroad?

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Friday, November 1, 2013 at 12:04 AM

United States privacy law traditionally has only protected the privacy of those in the United States and U.S. citizens abroad. Over at Just Security, David Cole argues that this should change. Privacy is a human right, he argues, and U.S. law should protect the privacy of foreigners all around the world. David offers three pragmatic . . .
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Is the Supreme Court Likely to Rule on FISA Section 702?

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Tuesday, October 29, 2013 at 7:00 AM

The Justice Department recently changed its policy on notice to criminal defendants about the use of evidence derived from surveillance under Section 702 of FISA. Press reports have treated the change as momentous, with the New York Times and the Associated Press predicting that the new policy will likely lead to a Supreme Court case . . .
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U.S. Notifies Criminal Defendant of Its Intention To Use FISA Information Against Him

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Saturday, October 26, 2013 at 5:06 PM

In what could be a consequential move, federal prosecutors this week informed a man accused of providing material support to the Islamic Jihad Union (“IJU”) that they intend to “offer into evidence or otherwise use or disclose in proceedings [against him] … information obtained or derived from” intelligence collection conducted under Section 702 of FISA. The 2011 complaint filed . . .
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Dispatch from Berlin on a Diplomatic Disaster

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Friday, October 25, 2013 at 7:00 AM

A diplomatic disaster for the United States is currently unfolding in Berlin. The revelation that the NSA may have monitored cell phone conversations and text messages of Chancellor Angela Merkel has led to popular outrage in Germany, as well as unusually pointed language from the Chancellor and other government officials. The U.S. Ambassador was not . . .
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New Reports on Drone Strike Casualties in Pakistan and Yemen

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Tuesday, October 22, 2013 at 3:24 PM

Two human rights groups released reports today on civilian casualties from selected drone strikes in Pakistan and Yemen. Amnesty International’s “Will I Be Next?” US Drone Strikes in Pakistan investigates nine drone strikes in North Waziristan between January 2012 and August 2013. Human Rights Watch’s “Between a Drone and Al Qaeda” The Civilian Cost of US Targeted Killings in . . .
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The Debt Ceiling as a National Security Issue

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Wednesday, October 16, 2013 at 7:49 AM

If a body other than the Congress of the United States were actively contemplating a step that would, by the accounts of virtually all economists, tank the U.S. economy, cause interest rates to shoot up, and trigger a financial crisis, we would talk about that body as threat to national security. At a minimum, we . . .
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