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Tag Archives: NATO

“Drones Are the Future for Dull or Dangerous Missions”

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Wednesday, October 9, 2013 at 7:00 PM

The splendidly quotable title quote – “Clearly, drones are the future for dull or dangerous missions” – comes from Dan Jangblad , chief strategy officer for Sweden’s aerospace company, Saab AB, by way of an article in today’s Wall Street Journal (David Pearson, October 9, 2013, B6, likely behind paywall), “Europe’s  Elusive Drone Push.”  The article . . .
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The Value of Kosovo as a Non-Legal Precedent

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Saturday, August 24, 2013 at 2:12 PM

Jack’s post makes the point that the Kosovo precedent won’t get the U.S. government very far if it is looking for a solid international legal precedent for intervention in Syria.  That seems absolutely right.  But it also seems worth asking: if Kosovo isn’t a good legal precedent for Syria, how good a precedent is it . . .
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The Kosovo Precedent for Syria Isn’t Much of a Precedent

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Saturday, August 24, 2013 at 8:02 AM

As the pressure to intervene in Syria builds, the administration once again, as in Libya, appears more focused on international law than domestic law.  Here is what the President said Thursday night in a CNN interview: . . . When we take action – let’s just take the example of Syria.  There are rules of international law. . . .
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Chemical Weapons in Syria: Enough to Justify the Use of Force?

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Friday, April 26, 2013 at 10:25 PM

Now that the United States has acknowledged – with a modest level of confidence – that the Syrian government has used chemical weapons against the rebels, many press articles are asking whether (or arguing that) the United States should consider using force in Syria. See, for example, here, here, and here. Senators McCain and Feinstein . . .
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Constitution Project Report on Detainee Treatment Concludes U.S. Engaged in Torture

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Tuesday, April 16, 2013 at 1:15 PM

The Constitution Project has released the results of its Task Force on Detainee Treatment in the form of this 577-page report—which concludes that “it is indisputable that the United States engaged in the practice of torture” and that “the nation’s highest officials bear some responsibility for allowing and contributing to the spread of torture.” Here . . .
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Turkish Leftist Group Likely Responsible for Attack on U.S. Embassy in Ankara

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Sunday, February 3, 2013 at 1:20 PM

Within hours of Friday’s suicide bombing, which killed one Turkish security guard, Turkish authorities had blamed the attack on a Turkish leftist group known as the Revolutionary People’s Liberation Party-Front (DHKP/C), an illegal Marxist organization established in the 1970s. Further information this weekend has confirmed those initial suspicions. Yesterday, the DHKP/C issued a statement claiming . . .
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Syrian Intervention and International Law

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Friday, January 18, 2013 at 2:37 PM

I have an op-ed in today’s Washington Post entitled (in the print edition) “Aiding Syria: Easier said than done” in which I describe some of the international legal obstacles to intervening in Syria.   Here are a couple of excerpts: Obama’s caution about intervening directly in Syria or arming the opposition has been prudent. Intervention without . . .
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Self-Defeating Humanitarian Efforts in Africa

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Monday, January 14, 2013 at 10:14 AM

Current events in Africa illustrate the unintended and sometimes-self-defeating effects of humanitarian efforts on that continent. First, France’s military action against Islamist insurgents in Mali raises the question why Islamists are on the rise in Mali and elsewhere in North Africa.  There are many causes, but the proximate one is the 2011 NATO invasion of . . .
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The Libyan Afterparty Continues

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Wednesday, December 5, 2012 at 8:46 PM

Walter Russell Mead coined the phrase “Libyan afterparty” to describe the many unintended and unhappy consequences – especially for the rise of Islamist terrorist power centers in Northern Africa – of the 2011 U.S. and NATO invasion of Libya.  (Some of Mead’s terrific posts on the issue can be found here and here and here . . .
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Yes, the EU has a navy, sort of…

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Tuesday, May 15, 2012 at 5:03 PM

As Raffaela noted in today’s news summary, it is being reported today that EU naval forces attacked pirate bases on the Somali mainland.  Several people have asked: “The EU has a navy?” The background here is legally, operationally, and diplomatically interesting.  These anti-piracy operations are conducted as part of a multilateral coalition, acting pursuant to . . .
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NATO’s Role in Libya was a Joke [UPDATED]

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Sunday, April 15, 2012 at 2:42 PM

An important predicate for the legal and political justification for the U.S. role in the Libya intervention was that the United States, following the initial air attacks in March 2011, would transfer responsibility for operations in Libya to NATO and thereafter play only a secondary, supportive role.  This point was emphasized by President Obama in . . .
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General John Allen on the U.S. Mission in Afghanistan

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Monday, March 26, 2012 at 5:17 PM

Brookings hosted General John Allen, commander of the International Security Assistance Force, for a discussion today of the U.S. and NATO mission in Afghanistan today. Here is the audio:

Does the Russian Veto of the Proposed UNSC Resolution on Syria Vindicate Scott Horton and Walter Russell Mead?

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Saturday, February 4, 2012 at 3:58 PM

Russia and China today vetoed a proposed UNSC Resolution (stories here and here) that would have condemned the abuses in Syria, demanded their cessation, required Syria to give free rein to League of Arab States’ institutions and Arab and international media, and called for an “an inclusive Syrian-led political process conducted in an environment free . . .
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Haji Mali Khan, Haqqani’s Senior Commander, Captured in Afghanistan

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Saturday, October 1, 2011 at 4:25 PM

CNN is reporting that Haji Mali Khan, the senior commander of the Afghan Haqqani insurgent group, was captured in a joint Afghan-NATO operation on Tuesday (the announcement of his capture was delayed until today because of difficulties confirming his identity). Khan is the uncle of Siraj and Badruddin Haqqani, the two brothers who run the . . .
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Michael Yon on General Martins and the NATO Rule of Law Field Support Mission

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Wednesday, July 13, 2011 at 9:30 AM

Michael Yon, whose dispatches from the field are always interesting (and typically include copious photography to give you a feel for what he has seen), recently traveled with General Martins in connection with the stand-up of the NATO Rule of Law Field Support Mission.  His coverage, including some great pics, is here.

NATO Stands Up Rule of Law Field Support Mission in Afghanistan

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Wednesday, July 6, 2011 at 2:07 PM

Kandahar–Among the ceremonies in Afghanistan on this past July 4th was one having more to do with Afghans and their international partners than with the United States troops stationed here, though we Americans saw strong connections between our allies’ celebration and our own Independence Day observances.  Implementing last month’s decision of the North Atlantic Treaty . . .
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Koh’s Written Testimony on the WPR: Arguably Defeating the Section 8(c) Argument, but Struggling with the “Armed Conflict=Hostilities” Argument

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Tuesday, June 28, 2011 at 3:48 PM

Harold Koh’s written testimony in connection with today’s SFRC hearing on the WPR and Libya is now available,. [Update: Testimony from Lou Fisher is here.  Testimony from Peter Spiro is here.]  It is much the same as the oral presentation this morning, of course, including the emphasis on four conditions of constraint that undergird the analysis . . .
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An Overview of Harold Koh’s Testimony on the WPR at Today’s SFRC Hearing

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Tuesday, June 28, 2011 at 11:48 AM

For the benefit of those who could not watch the SFRC hearing this morning on Libya and the WPR, here are highlights from the oral testimony from State Department Legal Advisor Harold Koh (the written testimony is not yet publicly available, but we will post it shortly). Koh’s opening statement: The word “hostilities,” which is . . .
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Do Commentators and Congress Treat All of the WPR as Law: The 60-Day Clock, Again

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Friday, June 24, 2011 at 4:56 PM

First, my thanks to Ben, Jack, and Bobby for permitting me to become an affiliated blogger on this terrific site. We are likely soon to get a test of how seriously Congress takes all of the War Powers Resolution (WPR). In particular, is Congress prepared to insist that the 60-day clock provision — thought to . . .
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Problems with the Obama Administration’s War Powers Resolution Theory

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Thursday, June 16, 2011 at 8:38 AM

In this long post I analyze the Obama administration’s legal arguments for compliance with the War Powers Resolution.  A later post will consider the broader significance of the arguments. Here is the administration’s formal explanation of its compliance with the WPR: The President is of the view that the current U.S. military operations in Libya are consistent with . . .
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