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Tag Archives: Muammar Gaddafi

Self-Defeating Humanitarian Efforts in Africa

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Monday, January 14, 2013 at 10:14 AM

Current events in Africa illustrate the unintended and sometimes-self-defeating effects of humanitarian efforts on that continent. First, France’s military action against Islamist insurgents in Mali raises the question why Islamists are on the rise in Mali and elsewhere in North Africa.  There are many causes, but the proximate one is the 2011 NATO invasion of . . .
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Complexities in USG Covert Action to Supply Weapons to Syrian Rebels

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Sunday, December 9, 2012 at 3:32 PM

Last week I noted that U.S.-blessed Qatari arms shipments meant for Libyan rebels were diverted to Islamist terrorist groups in North Africa.  This morning’s papers imply the possibility of something similar happening in Syria.  The New York Times has a story on the Nusra Front, the al Qaeda-approved rebel group in Syria that is “a direct offshoot . . .
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The Libyan Afterparty Continues

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Wednesday, December 5, 2012 at 8:46 PM

Walter Russell Mead coined the phrase “Libyan afterparty” to describe the many unintended and unhappy consequences – especially for the rise of Islamist terrorist power centers in Northern Africa – of the 2011 U.S. and NATO invasion of Libya.  (Some of Mead’s terrific posts on the issue can be found here and here and here . . .
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Does the Russian Veto of the Proposed UNSC Resolution on Syria Vindicate Scott Horton and Walter Russell Mead?

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Saturday, February 4, 2012 at 3:58 PM

Russia and China today vetoed a proposed UNSC Resolution (stories here and here) that would have condemned the abuses in Syria, demanded their cessation, required Syria to give free rein to League of Arab States’ institutions and Arab and international media, and called for an “an inclusive Syrian-led political process conducted in an environment free . . .
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Recognition of the Libyan Rebels, Conflict Status, and Detention Operations

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Friday, July 15, 2011 at 10:54 AM

The armed conflict in Libya began as a non-international armed conflict, but was internationalized when a host of states intervened against the Libyan government.  Now, the United States has joined a growing list of states recognizing the rebels as the legitimate government of Libya, which leaves no state party to the conflict on the other side . . .
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An Overview of Harold Koh’s Testimony on the WPR at Today’s SFRC Hearing

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Tuesday, June 28, 2011 at 11:48 AM

For the benefit of those who could not watch the SFRC hearing this morning on Libya and the WPR, here are highlights from the oral testimony from State Department Legal Advisor Harold Koh (the written testimony is not yet publicly available, but we will post it shortly). Koh’s opening statement: The word “hostilities,” which is . . .
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More on Libya and the WPR: McKeon’s Letter to the President, and a Proposed Senate Resolution

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Wednesday, May 25, 2011 at 8:18 AM

Further to this post on the President’s letter to Congress (and its significance in light of the War Powers Resolution, or “WPR”), here are two recent and quite post-worthy developments regarding military action in Libya.  First up is a letter which Congressman Howard P. “Buck” McKeon, Chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, sent to the . . .
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Ackerman and Hathaway on the Expiration of the WPR’s 60-day Time Clock

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Wednesday, May 18, 2011 at 7:35 PM

In yesterday’s Washington Post, Professors Bruce Ackerman and Oona Hathaway editorialized about the “Death of the War Powers Act.” Their piece is provocative, in part because it suggests that the executive has blessed the War Powers Resolution’s (“WPR”) 60-day time limit as a permissible exercise of congressional power.   (Bobby has a post on the . . .
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Lowering the Domestic Political Cost of Humanitarian Intervention

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Wednesday, April 27, 2011 at 12:10 PM

I have recently blogged about two issues:  whether congressional authorization is required as a constitutional matter for U.S. involvement in military operations such as the one in Libya, see here and here, and whether modern technology (such as unmanned drones) is making it easier to avoid thinking about the human cost of warfare, see here. . . .
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Problems with the Espionage Act

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Thursday, December 2, 2010 at 7:21 AM

Amid the proliferating cries for prosecuting Julian Assange and shutting down Wikileaks–an undertaking for which, I should note, I harbor no small sympathy–a few people have noted that the Espionage Act has, well, some problems as a legal instrument for the project. As Josh Gerstein’s story in the Politico notes, the First Amendment would have something–nobody . . .
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