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Tag Archives: Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)

On the CIA Inspector General’s Findings

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Friday, August 1, 2014 at 7:12 AM

I have largely refrained, until now, from wading into the dispute between the Senate Intelligence Committee and the CIA over the mutual hacking allegations, on the theory that the facts were all contested and I couldn’t make heads or tails of what had really happened. That changed yesterday with the release of a summary of . . .
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The Administration Needs a Confirmed Legal Adviser

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Monday, July 28, 2014 at 10:25 AM

Six months ago today, I wondered aloud on this blog when President Obama might nominate a new Legal Adviser.   At that point, the position had been vacant for over a year since Harold Koh stepped down in January 2013.  The Administration has now been without a Legal Adviser and the Legal Adviser’s office has been . . .
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More Machinations in Second Circuit Targeted Killing FOIA Litigation

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Thursday, July 24, 2014 at 2:02 PM

The release last month of the Al-Aulaqi Office of Legal Counsel memo, it turns out, was not the end of the Second Circuit litigation regarding the New York Times and ACLU’s FOIA requests for information on the government’s targeted killing programs. A petition for rehearing en banc is still pending. And yesterday, the Justice Department, the Pentagon, and . . .
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The CIA Joins Twitter

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Friday, June 6, 2014 at 10:01 PM

And it’s first tweet is, well, pretty amusing: We can neither confirm nor deny that this is our first tweet. — CIA (@CIA) June 6, 2014

Drone Strikes and the CIA vs JSOC Quality-Control Comparison

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Monday, May 12, 2014 at 10:15 AM

For those who are still wondering why the Obama administration has not followed through on the idea of shifting all responsibility for drone strikes from CIA to JSOC, this story from Ken Dilanian of the L.A. Times provides some useful context. Building on an account about a CIA-JSOC disagreement regarding the sufficiency of the intelligence . . .
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Text of Senator Feinstein’s Remarks This Morning Regarding SSCI and CIA

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Tuesday, March 11, 2014 at 11:28 AM

You can find the Senator’s statement here.  Her speech began as follows: Over the past week, there have been numerous press articles written about the Intelligence Committee’s oversight review of the Detention and Interrogation Program of the CIA, specifically press attention has focused on the CIA’s intrusion and search of the Senate Select Committee’s computers . . .
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Senator Feinstein’s Remarks on the CIA-SSCI Document Controversy

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Tuesday, March 11, 2014 at 9:39 AM

Right now, Senator Dianne Feinstein, the Senate Intelligence Committee’s Chairman, is speaking out, on the Senate floor, about a well-publicized dispute between the CIA and the SSCI—regarding the latter’s review of documents pertaining to the CIA’s interrogation practices in the years following 9/11, and the CIA’s auditing of Committee staffers’ computer use during the review. . . .
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Cole and Lederman, and Morell, on Review Group Report

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Monday, December 23, 2013 at 4:39 PM

Marty Lederman has a good summary of the highlights of the President’s Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technologies at Just Security.  And he and David Cole have a lengthy post on what they say is a neglected issue in coverage of the Report: The issue of the proper use by the government of meta-data, as opposed . . .
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Krass on Numerous National Security Law Issues

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Tuesday, December 17, 2013 at 8:06 PM

Caroline Krass had her confirmation hearings today before SSCI to become General Counsel of CIA.  Krass is, in my opinion, wildly qualified for the job, and I hope her confirmation process goes smoothly despite unrelated SSCI-CIA disagreements over the release of SSCI’s critical report on the Bush-era interrogation program.  Of special interest to foreign relations . . .
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Dirty Wars: The World is a Battlefield

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Sunday, November 3, 2013 at 9:04 PM

Dirty Wars: The World is a Battlefield by Jeremy Scahill—the activist-turned journalist previously known for his exposé of the military contractor formerly known as Blackwater—is a bad book. But it’s a bad book with a significantly redeeming feature. Scahill’s project is to depict the “dark side” of what he considers to be America’s unrestrained pursuit of security . . .
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CIA Files Reply Memo in Drone FOIA Case

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Saturday, November 2, 2013 at 9:07 PM

The CIA’s efforts to deny the ACLU’s FOIA requests for records about the Agency’s involvement in drone-based targeted killings continue apace in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. The Agency filed a reply memorandum in favor of summary judgment  on the matter in D.D.C. on November 1. Lawfare readers may recall the March . . .
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On The Timing of a Trial in the 9/11 Case

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Monday, October 28, 2013 at 2:56 PM

We’re a long ways way off from a trial in United States v. Mohammed et. al.   That’s the essence of my Security States piece, which went up today.  It begins: So when will the 9/11 case go to trial, anyway? I have observed the Guantanamo proceedings for a while now, and hear the question a lot—from supporters and critics . . .
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10/25 Motions Session #4: Photos and 802 Conferences

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Friday, October 25, 2013 at 1:04 PM

Many different motions get batted around during the pre-lunch period, but only two take up substantial argument time.  (The remainder—among other things, AE120, regarding the prosecution’s proposed changes to the charge sheet, and a discovery motion regarding the interactions of the government with the makers of Zero Dark Thirty—are either deferred until December, or will . . .
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Fourth Circuit: No Rehearing En Banc in U.S. v. Sterling

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Tuesday, October 15, 2013 at 6:58 PM

Here’s the Fourth Circuit’s order denying two petitions for rehearing en banc—-one by New York Times reporter James Risen, the other by former CIA Officer Jeffrey Sterling.    This past summer, a panel held, in a 2-1 vote, that the journalist had no First Amendment privilege enabling him to refuse to testify in the leak prosecution against Sterling. . . .
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National Security, the Shutdown, and Moral Seriousness

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Sunday, October 6, 2013 at 9:00 PM

Imagine if the Democrats in 2007, having just regained control of the Congress, had decided to go to the mat against the Bush tax cuts. Imagine that they voted repeatedly to repeal them. They tried to delay implementation. They linked repeal to debt ceiling legislation. And while most of them knew better than to shut . . .
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Two Notes on Secrecy v. Transparency in the National Security World

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Thursday, October 3, 2013 at 12:24 PM

Two pieces in the news worth noting on the issue of secrecy v. transparency in the U.S. intelligence world.  First, The Guardian reports that former DRNSA and CIA Director Michael Hayden said in London: “It’s clear to me now that in liberal democracies the security services don’t get to do what they do without broad public understanding . . .
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The Obama Administration’s National Security Legal Team

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Wednesday, September 4, 2013 at 10:14 AM

Ben observed last week that in the midst of the most significant war powers debate of this Presidency, many of the top national security legal positions in the Administration remain unfilled.  So who is minding the store?  Fortunately, some very highly qualified and experienced lawyers, all of whom are currently working around the clock. At . . .
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On the Unsurprising Continuation of Drone Strikes

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Saturday, August 3, 2013 at 9:30 AM

There is an interesting article in the New York Times this morning, from Mark Mazzetti and Mark Landler, the thrust of which is captured by the headline: “Despite Administration Promises, Few Signs of Change in Drone Wars.”  The article emphasizes the central role that the CIA continues to play in Yemen, for example, something that . . .
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The Remarkably Open Syrian Covert Action

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Tuesday, July 23, 2013 at 12:30 PM

There are at least three noteworthy elements in the WP’s story this morning about intelligence committee “approval” of “CIA weapons shipments to opposition fighters in Syria.” First is the fact that the intelligence committees “voted on the administration’s plan” last week.  An intelligence committee vote is not typically a prerequisite to a covert action.  Under the covert . . .
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Blaming (or Crediting) the Lawyers for Our Syria Policy

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Monday, July 15, 2013 at 10:38 AM

This morning both the WSJ (behind paywall) and NYT have stories on how law and lawyers have influenced the changing USG posture on intervening in Syria.  The gist of the WSJ story is that administration lawyers, apparently relying on the ICJ Nicaragua Case, pushed back against policy makers who called for “more assertive U.S. action . . .
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