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Category Archives: Privacy

Fishing Expedition

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Friday, February 27, 2015 at 4:00 PM

Do you worry that the NSA, perhaps in a joint program with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, might be considering a “collect-it-all” program to seize and monitor fish, crocodiles, or antelopes for national security purposes?  If so – and I think I may have read something about this on The Intercept – you can . . .
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Senate Commerce Committee Hearing on “Preserving the Multistakeholder Model of Internet Governance”

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Wednesday, February 25, 2015 at 9:55 AM

The Senate panel, led by Chairman John Thune (R-SD), will discuss internet governance matters this morning at 10:00 a.m. A livestream can be found at the Commerce Committee’s website; we’ll post embedded video if it is available. The witnesses (with links to testimony): Mr. Fadi Chehadé CEO, Internet Corporation for Assigned Name and Numbers (ICANN) Ambassador . . .
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Making Progress on the Encryption Debate

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Tuesday, February 24, 2015 at 1:24 PM

In a recent debate between NSA director Mike Rogers and Yahoo Chief Information Security Officer Alex Stamos, the topic of law-enforcement restricted access to encrypted communications once again came up. To summarize the debate as it has been expressed to date, one side believes in encryption that only the user can decrypt. Those on this . . .
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Expanding on the International vs. U.S. Surveillance Law Comparisons

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Tuesday, February 24, 2015 at 10:00 AM

Following my post from last week  regarding how the debate over the Snowden disclosures has blurred the distinctions between national security surveillance authorities and consumer privacy law, Tim Edgar pointed out yesterday  that U.S. law is probably one of the most, if not the most, protective legal structures concerning government access to data for national . . .
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Mysterious Discretion: When Journalists Wield Power We Don’t Understand

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Monday, February 23, 2015 at 2:00 PM

Last night, Laura Poitras’s Citizenfour received an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature, a win I have been anticipating since Glenn Greenwald won the Pulitzer Prize back in April for breaking the Edward Snowden leaks. In honor of the occasion, let’s reflect on the single most compelling moment in Citizenfour. I am talking about the moment in the . . .
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Why Should We Buy Into The Notion That The United States Doesn’t Care About Privacy?

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Monday, February 23, 2015 at 8:23 AM

It is a common perception that Americans care less about privacy than Europeans, especially after the attacks of September 11, and the Snowden revelations only seemed to reinforce that perception. Last week, President Obama argued that European privacy complaints are really about something else. Europeans, he said, may simply be using privacy fears as a . . .
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The President’s Comments on European Privacy Claims and A Look Back at the LIBE Committee Report on Government Surveillance

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Thursday, February 19, 2015 at 4:30 PM

President Obama made a refreshing observation during an interview with Re/Code at the White House Summit on Cyber Security and Consumer Protection in Silicon Valley last week. Following an exchange regarding the need for greater privacy for students using the Internet for educational purposes, the discussion turned to European scrutiny of U.S.-based technology companies, and . . .
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Two Reflections on the White House Cybersecurity Summit

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Friday, February 13, 2015 at 10:27 PM

As many know, the White House held a summit on cybersecurity and consumer protection at Stanford University today.  In addition to President Obama, a number of CEOs also spoke on privacy and security issues in the context of consumer protection, and of course the backdrop for much of the summit was the Snowden revelations and . . .
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First Take on Government’s Surveillance Reform Update Report

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Wednesday, February 4, 2015 at 3:12 PM

As Wells noted yesterday the Administration released its report on the implementation of Presidential Policy Directive (PPD)-28. I am still reading through the documents, which include twelve new agency-specific procedures that implement Section 4 of PPD-28, as well as additional restrictions on the counterterrorism telephone metadata program. For now, this post provides observations on two items contained . . .
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Data Analytics and Policing

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Wednesday, February 4, 2015 at 9:25 AM

This interesting article on the NYPD’s use of data analytics came across my desk the other day.  Here is the abstract: The New York City Police Department’s Lower Manhattan Security Coordination Center integrates data from a variety of sources, including sensors (cameras, license plate readers, and environmental detectors) and records (arrests, complaints, summonses, 911 calls, . . .
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What Happens if We #Sunset215?

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Tuesday, February 3, 2015 at 2:30 PM

A law the government cites as authority for the bulk collection of millions of Americans’ communications records—Section 215 of the PATRIOT Act—expires unless Congress extends it by Memorial Day weekend. The Center for Democracy & Technology, and other public interest groups, believes that Sec. 215 should sunset unless it is reformed to stop nationwide surveillance . . .
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PCLOB Releases Recommendation Assessment Report

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Thursday, January 29, 2015 at 4:14 PM

The Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board has released an assessment of the status of each of the Board’s 22 recommendations regarding Section 215 and Section 702 programs. More information, including the assessment, a fact sheet, and a table summarizing the Board’s recommendations, can be found in the release by the Board—the relevant part of . . .
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Harvard Event with Bruce Schneier and Edward Snowden

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Monday, January 26, 2015 at 12:20 PM

On Friday, the former spoke by videolink with the latter, about (unsurprisingly enough) surveillance, privacy and data security. Youtube has a video of their discussion:

The French Response to Terror: Counterterrorism Detention and Prosecutions Across the Atlantic

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Wednesday, January 21, 2015 at 12:15 PM

In the aftermath of the Paris terror attacks on Charlie Hebdo and a kosher grocery, Western European security forces unleashed a dizzying storm of arrests and prosecutions and announced “exceptional” new measures to combat terrorism. In the space of just a few days, dozens of suspects were detained in Belgium, France and Germany, many of whom were questioned for days without . . .
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The NRC’s Bulk Collection Report: a High-Level Overview

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Tuesday, January 20, 2015 at 3:00 PM

Last week, Wells noted the release of an important, 85-page report by the National Research Council. (Yesterday, Herb Lin added his thoughts about it.) Broadly, Bulk Collection of Signals Intelligence: Technical Options concludes that right now, there are no software-based techniques that could fully replace the bulk collection of data. Below, I offer a high-level, . . .
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What David Cameron Doesn’t Get

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Tuesday, January 20, 2015 at 10:30 AM

Last week British Prime Minister David Cameron gave an extraordinary speech in which he urged the the banning of private communications, that is communications to which the government could not listen into when legally authorized to do so. Cameron is not the first government official to do so; GCHQ Director Robert Hannigan urged the same . . .
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President Obama Comments on Back-doors in Encryption

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Friday, January 16, 2015 at 5:50 PM

We’ve yet to find a transcript of President Obama’s remarks during today’s press conference with British Prime Minister David Cameron, but according to several news outlets, the President made a number of interesting statements regarding cybersecurity and data encryption. “If we get into a situation which the technologies do not allow us at all to track . . .
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Did the FBI Just Prevent an Attack in DC from a Homegrown ISIS Supporter?

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Wednesday, January 14, 2015 at 6:12 PM

A very, very big arrest in Cincinnati today, involving allegations that a man named Christopher Cornell (online alias Raheel Mahrus Ubaydah) had planned to travel to DC in order to carry out an attack (via assault rifle) at the Capitol. It appears Cornell was arrested today after he purchased two ArmaLite M-15s. How did the . . .
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Lawfare Buys A Bitcoin—Buying the Coin

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Wednesday, January 7, 2015 at 11:04 AM

So . . .  you can’t explore bitcoins unless you actually have one in hand. If you don’t then, well, it’s really all pretty theoretical. We wanted to have some skin in the game, so to speak, so we decided we needed a bitcoin of our own.  For reasons that will become clear as we . . .
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District Court Suppresses Pole Camera Surveillance Footage

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Thursday, December 18, 2014 at 4:41 PM

Twitter brings news of this interesting little order in United States v. Vargas.  The court’s opinion was authored by Judge Edward F. Shea and opens: The first duty of government is the safety of its people—by Constitutional means and methods. Technology, including the means for covert surveillance of individuals through the use of a hidden video camera . . .
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